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Gold, oil & 44 Bars per Minute

Gold, oil & 44 Bars per Minute

“Girls love to spin.” — Wayne, Dance Instructor, Howard County Parks and Rec. I’m taking dance classes at the local Parks & Rec. with a stunning brunette, which is why I’m shuffling my feet around on Sunday nights at eight. The crowd is mixed; twenty-something hipster couples and old guys who have difficulty with their gig lines. The instructor is a cross between Wayne Newton and Telly Savalas: a black silk shirt, shaved head, and a nose like an organic potato. He sucks his microphone like a lollipop and spits out a steady stream of advice: “One, two, hook the toe, slide back, twirl…” Chick magnet The chicks love him, of course. And heck, I was even having a good timeďż˝— right up until Wayne Savalas swished over during the break. My H1 was in the parking lot. It’s shiny, yellow, and chews diesel like a Mongolian wrestler at a yak roast. Wayne obviously saw me pull up and feels he should enlighten me about his new Chevy Volt getting 60 miles per gallon… And why would I drive something that sucks up so much gas and destroys the environment? I told him that I was fully invested in oil explorers. And with the trouble in the Middle East launching my shares, I could drive a Semi for life… Brent Crude ETF (BNO) Yes, he said, but is this more of a trade on the Arab revolutions, or does it have more to do with the destruction of the dollar? Wayne pointed out that the dollar/euro has hit a four-month low and seems to be heading lower. Down she goes What is most concerning is that during this particular period of global uncertainty, the

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Sweet Monday Mornings

Filed in AIG, BP, o, silver by on February 28, 2011 0 Comments

Remarkable isn’t it? It has almost become like clockwork – I’ve never seen a pattern continue like this at a 80%+ type of success rate.  Another wonderful surge in futures between 6 AM and 9 AM on a Monday morning, for no particular reason (not ev…

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What’s Really Wrong With America

Filed in Alan Greenspan, BP, Gold, GOld juniors, Lear, o by on February 28, 2011 0 Comments
What’s Really Wrong With America

  Here’s a wonderful video I came across visiting Washington’s Blog this morning. It’s a great read if you haven’t discovered it already. As the video reminds us…. “The Funders” are not “The People”. You have to act to get it back.   There is a reason everything is so screwed up. The further you stray from our beginnings the worse everything becomes. Related Article: NEWSFLASH: The Meltdown Didn’t Have to Happen Bill Black: Fire Holder, Geithner and Bernanke The No Spin Zone: Bill Black Calls BS Epic Fail: Brooksley Born Demolishes Alan Greenspan Matt Taibbi: Goldman is “Re-creating the conditions for another crash” To learn more about Wealth Daily click here Advertisement 21st Century Medicine … Is exactly what you thought it would be. An AIDS vaccine has been tested. New organs are being grown. Limbs are being created from scratch. But humanity isn’t the sole motivator… Serious cash stands to be made by curing diseases. One small biotech firm — featured on 60 Minutes — is on the path to even wilder medical breakthroughs. To see what I mean and learn about this company, watch this brief presentation . What’s Really Wrong With America originally appeared in Wealth Daily . Wealth Daily is a free daily newsletter featuring contrarian investment insights and commentary.

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TD Ameritrade (AMTD) Joins GE (GE), Coke (KO), McDonalds (MCD), Visa (V), AT&T (T) As USOC Sponsor

TD Ameritrade Holding Corp. (NASDAQ:AMTD) has reportedly signed on to be a sponsor for the U.S. Olympic Committee, the first in the online broker segment to do so.They will join others like Acer, Coca-Cola (NYSE:KO), Visa (NYSE:V), Anheuser-Busch (NYSE:BUD), AT&T (NYSE:T), Dow Chemical (NYSE:DOW), Atos Origin, BMW Group NA, BP (NYSE:BP), General Electric (NYSE:GE), McDonald’s (NYSE:MCD), Procter

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How to Buy Yukon Gold Stocks

Filed in BP, Ford, Gold, Gold Exploration, Gold Market, gold-stocks, Lear, New Gold, o, target by on February 18, 2011 0 Comments

For the past few weeks, I’ve been urging investors to take a close look at a quality gold exploration companies working in Canada’s Yukon Territory… But with so many Yukon gold stocks to choose from, it can be difficult for investors to determine which companies deserve the most attention. And that’s exactly why I put this article together for you today. For the first time ever, I’ll be publishing some of the guidelines I’ve been personally using to buy Yukon gold stocks. The very first thing investors should know is that the Yukon gold story is just getting started. Last year, nearly 80,000 new gold claims were staked in the Yukon. But this represents only 4% of the Yukon’s total land mass. There is still plenty of staking potential. In 2011, however, it’s very likely we’ll see several companies make big gold discoveries. In an average year, only about $20 or $30 million is spent exploring for gold in the Yukon. Now that the price of gold is breaking record highs, about $100 million is spent in an average year. But in 2011, the Yukon Geological Survey estimates almost $330 million will be spent for work programs and drilling this summer in the Yukon. With so much exploration going on, someone will no doubt find gold. Almost 20 million ounces of placer gold have been taken out of the Yukon Territory over the century. The Yukon overall has the biggest placer gold signatures in the world — meaning there are very large sources of gold in the Yukon from whence this gold sprang. Geologists generally agree that the source of the placer deposits is typically 10 times larger than the amount of placer gold discovered in an area. In the case of …

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Urban Magnets for Disaster

Filed in BP, deflation, economy, Ford, Gold, inflation, o, silver, ubs, US Dollar by on February 18, 2011 0 Comments

When it comes to bad stuff the sky’s the limit. It’s gonna happen, eventually…one way or another. And it could be real bad. And when bad stuff happens, you’re better off being somewhere else. Where? Generally, bad stuff seems to happen most often in cities. Why is that? Cities are where most people live. It is where governments are. And it is where the labor force is most specialized. There are no subsistence farmers living in cities. Nor do urban populations “live off the land.” Instead, they depend on complex networks of commerce. The typical city dweller produces neither food nor energy. He sits all day in an office — completely dependent on others to provide power and food. Then, he goes home — still completely dependent on the division of labor for his most important needs. Progress can be described as the elaboration of the division of labor. In man’s most primitive state, specialization is extremely limited. From what we’ve been told, the early man was the hunter. Early woman gathered…that’s about the extent of it. As the tribe grows larger, specialization increases. One person might tend the fire. Another might be in charge of making clothes or arrows. The advent of sedentary agriculture and towns caused a big leap forward in human progress and, not coincidentally, the division of labor. Some townspeople went out to tend the fields. Others began to focus on woodworking…or iron mongering…or making weapons…or clothes. Some played cards and hung around at bars. There was soon a homebuilding industry…and, not long after, merchants, prostitutes and bankers…and even shyster lawyers and tax collectors. As the division of labor expanded, the average person became richer…and more dependent on others. In order to eat, someone else had to plant…and till…and harvest…and hunt…and gather. And then, when agriculture became mechanized, he depended on faraway people who produced oil and gasoline…and people who built …

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Gallup: The Unemployment Rate is 10%

Gallup:  The Unemployment Rate is 10%

  Jobs…jobs…jobs… I’m beginning to sound like a broken record but it’s true: This economy is going nowhere unless we start creating some jobs. As for the recent drop in the unemployment rate to 9.0%, I’m not buying it since it comes from Uncle Sam. The real figure is likely closer to what Gallup is reporting today… From by Dennis Jacobe entitled: Gallup Finds U.S. Unemployment Up to 10% in Mid-February “Unemployment, as measured by Gallup without seasonal adjustment, hit 10.0% in mid-February — up from 9.8% at the end of January. Underemployment, in which Gallup combines part-time workers wanting full-time work with the U.S. unemployment rate, surged in mid-February to 19.6% — mostly as a result of the sharp increase in those working part time but wanting full-time work. Underemployment now stands at basically the same place as it did a year ago (19.8%). The unemployment rate in mid-February is 0.8 percentage points lower than it was at this time a year ago, compared with a 1.1-point improvement at the end of January. This suggests that jobs are less available now than they were in January. More troubling, however, is the surge in underemployment. On this broader basis, current job conditions are barely improved from what they were at this time last year. Essentially, what has happened over the past year is that some people who were unemployed got part-time jobs but are still looking for full-time work. This is not much to show for a year in which many macro-economic indicators showed improvement. This is likely why Gallup’s self-reported spending

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The Miracle of Regenerative Medicine

Filed in AMAG, BP, Gold, Gold Market, HAL, o, target by on February 17, 2011 0 Comments
The Miracle of Regenerative Medicine

Tall, dark, and handsome… Dr. Anthony Atala is not a guy you could easily mistake for Dr. Frankenstein. Yet, in his white lab coat, Atala is doing exactly what author Mary Shelley wrote about so long ago. A mad scientist in his own right, he is busy growing body parts in his Wake Forest lab. A finger here, a bladder there, Atala is currently growing dozens of different tissues. And from heart valves to muscles to ears, his Institute for Regenerative Medicine is literally about to turn the world on its head. Working at one of the world’s largest research facilities dedicated to regenerative medicine, the modern Dr. Frankenstein is adamant that his research will one day replace diseased or damaged tissue using homegrown replacement parts. After all, as Dr. Atala often pondered, “A salamander can grow back its leg, why can’t a human do the same?” Now, some twenty-four years later, that notion is no longer just a wild hypothetical; it’s a feat of modern science, stripped from the pages of a 194-year-old novel. Today, regenerative medicine stocks are the companies to watch as this amazing new technology unfolds. The promise of regenerative medicine Take the story of Claudia Castillo, for instance. In 2008, this 30-year-old mother of two became the first patient to receive a whole organ transplant without the need for powerful anti-rejection drugs. Damaged by a bout of tuberculosis, her entire windpipe was repaired with a replacement part created with the help of her own stem cells. And given the choice between losing a lung or becoming a guinea pig for a radical new medical technique, Castillo chose the latter — becoming one of the pioneers for future regenerative surgeries. Her life these days is not only back to normal… She recently called her doctors from a nightclub to tell them she had been out dancing all night. Before the ground-breaking surgery, Castillo could barely climb the stairs. Claudia’s story is just the beginning… In fact Dr. Atala’s team is currently working on re-growing over 23 different organs including the liver, heart, kidney, and bladder. Along the way, they have conquered a number of milestones in the field. From the website , these firsts include: Developing biological strategies to enable certain human cell types that were previously thought not to be expandable outside the body to be grown in…

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The Incredible Shrinking Middle Class

Filed in BP, Debt, economy, Ford, Gold, GOld juniors, inflation, Lear, o, recession, silver by on February 16, 2011 0 Comments
The Incredible Shrinking Middle Class

Here’s a copy of the chart of the day.As you might have suspected, the rich get richer while everyone else basically gets to tread water. The article that follows once again drives home a point I have been harping on for years now: The Middle Class in a state of terminal decline. And when it vanishes for good, America will be a very different place. If you ask me, in a lot of ways it already is…. From CNNMONEY by Annalyn Censky entitled: How the middle class became the underclass “ Are you better off than your parents? Probably not if you’re in the middle class. Incomes for 90% of Americans have been stuck in neutral, and it’s not just because of the Great Recession. Middle-class incomes have been stagnant for at least a generation, while the wealthiest tier has surged ahead at lighting speed. In 1988, the income of an average American taxpayer was $33,400, adjusted for inflation. Fast forward 20 years, and not much had changed: The average income was still just $33,000 in 2008, according to IRS data. Experts point to some of the usual suspects — like technology and globalization — to explain the widening gap between the haves and have-nots. One major pull on the working man was the decline of unions and other labor protections, said Bill Rodgers, a former chief economist for the Labor Department, now a professor at Rutgers University. International competition is another factor. While globalization has lifted millions out of poverty in developing nations, it hasn’t exactly been a win for middle class workers in the U.S. Factory workers have seen many of their jobs shipped to other countries where labor is cheaper, putting more downward pressure on American wages. “As we became more connected to China, that poses the question of whether our wages are being set in Beijing,” Rodgers said. Finding it harder to compete with cheaper manufacturing costs abroad, the U.S. has emerged as primarily a services-producing economy. That trend has created a cultural shift in the job skills American employers are looking for. As a result, the disparity between the wages for college educated workers versus high school grads has widened significantly since the 1980s. In 1980, workers …

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Gold, Silver, Copper, Nickel and the Slow Death of Money

Gold, Silver, Copper, Nickel and the Slow Death of Money

A huge opportunity to hedge against both inflation and deflation is lying out there in the open. There are no transaction costs and right now there’s even a built-in discount. But most people will never realize any of this. In 1933 President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed Executive Order 6102, which made it illegal for U.S. citizens to hold gold bullion. Prior to that, the $20 bill was essentially a warehouse receipt for a one-ounce gold coin. Prior to the Federal Reserve Act of 1914, the $20 bill actually told you this. After Executive Order 6102, $20 notes weren’t allowed to be exchanged for gold anymore. Americans couldn’t legally own or trade gold as money and savings, only as jewelry or collectible coins. A year after making monetary gold ownership illegal, FDR revalued gold from $20.67 per ounce to $35 an ounce with the Gold Reserve Act. The Act also required all gold and gold certificates to be turned over to the Treasury. The dollar was debased. A chunk of the gold it used to be good for was legally removed. Instead of  “containing” 1/20 an ounce of gold, each dollar now only contained (or represented) 1/35 an ounce. And of course you couldn’t actually own the gold itself. In 1971 Nixon severed the last official ties between gold and the dollar. The dollar quickly sunk to its real value, which had been debased by years of money supply inflation. By 1975 Americans were allowed to own bullion gold again, but during the roughly 40 years bullion gold ownership had been illegal, the dollar had been drastically debased. At its former lowest point in the summer of 1980, the dollar …

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Inflation in (Mostly) the Wrong Places

It is often claimed that inflation is a benign, even positive, force. People assume that prices, wages, and assets will all rise together… In the real world, inflationary episodes don’t play out that way. Wages don’t keep up, and bubbles form in unexpected (and unwanted) places. In America, compensation is clearly stagnant. And the outlook for future pay raises is not good, as this chart from David Rosenberg shows: Contrast that with this next chart, which shows the percentage of companies planning to raise prices: Combine stagnant wages and slow growth with high unemployment and rising prices, and you get a recipe for stagflation. This scenario is being played out around the world. In the UK, consumer prices rose 4% in 2010. As noted by the Financial Times , wages aren’t keeping up: The prices of everyday goods and services are rising about twice as rapidly as average wages, Tuesday’s inflation figures confirmed — which means that the standard of living of many Britons is already falling. According to the Bank of England, average pay at the end of this year will be able to buy no more than it could in 2005. It is the first time that the purchasing power of earnings has fallen so far since the 1920s. I expect this trend to continue as long as the Fed’s mad experiment is ongoing. The thing about Central Bank “easing” is you never know where inflation will pop up… Easy money will always fuel speculators, who have little skin in the game, to find another bubble to “invest” in. Silver, gold, oil With printing presses switched “on” for the foreseeable future, we remain bullish on precious metals. Silver is holding above $30 today and could hit $37.50 on the next leg up. Coal, oil, and natural gas investments should continue to do well. And as my colleague Nick Hodge of Energy and Capital says, “Buy it if it burns.” If you’re not yet convinced that Fed printing is directly related to rising commodity prices, examine the following chart. (The solid blue line represents the Austrian Money Supply (AMS), and the solid teal line represents commodity prices ( IMF Commodity Index )): Note: The version of money supply shown

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Is Warren Buffett Heading for the Exits?

Is Warren Buffett Heading for the Exits?

Nobody ever rings a bell at the top. That’s why sometimes it is instructive to keep an eye on so-called “smart-money”—especially when they make a move towards the door. All of which, strikes me as curious since just a few months ago the grandfatherly Buffett said, “I am a huge bull on this country. We are not going to have a double-dip recession at all. I see our businesses coming back across the board.” Hmmmm…I wonder if he has changed his mind on this one. From Bloomberg by Andrew Frye entitled: Berkshire Exits BofA ‘a Loser’ on Three-Year Holding. “Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway Inc. sold its stake in Bank of America Corp., ending an investment that spanned three and a half years in which the lender’s stock lost more than two-thirds of its value Buffett’s firm had no shares in the Charlotte, North Carolina-based bank at the end of 2010, compared with 5 million shares three months earlier, Berkshire said late yesterday in a regulatory filing that lists the company’s U.S. stockholdings. Berkshire, where Buffett serves as chief executive officer and head of investments, entered the Bank of America stake with the purchase of 8.7 million shares in the second quarter of 2007. The lender’s CEO at the time, Kenneth Lewis, was expanding through acquisitions and telling investors that the U.S. housing slump would be over within months. “He’s closing out a loser,” said Jeff Matthews, author of “Pilgrimage to Warren Buffett’s Omaha,” whose Ram Partners LP invests in Berkshire and Bank of America. “We bought it during the crisis. But its earnings power coming out the crisis has been reduced.” Berkshire also eliminated its stakes in Nike Inc., Comcast Corp., Nalco Holding Co., Fiserv Inc., Lowe’s Cos. and Becton, Dickinson & Co. in the fourth quarter. In November, Berkshire disclosed that it had sold holdings of Home Depot Inc., trash hauler Republic Services Inc. and Iron Mounta”in Inc., a provider of records management. Buffett’s U.S. portfolio had 25 stocks and a value of about $52.6 billion at the end of December.”   Maybe there is nothing to see here, but I don’t think so. You just can’t trust a guy that plays a ukulele.   Related Articles: Warren Buffett’s Dividend Stock Strategy The Good Works of Bill Gates and Warren Buffett Ben Graham’s Winning Investment Advice Warren Buffett: The Investor of the Year To learn more about Wealth Daily click here. Advertisement Samurai Super Alloy It was the secret ingredient that turned an ordinary sword into the legendary Samurai Katana — the deadliest weapon before the arrival of modern rifles. Today, it’s crucial to the $987billion/

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