E Reader

Will Android Capture First Place?

Filed in Apple, E Reader, Google, lead, o, South African Gold by on February 15, 2011 0 Comments
Will Android Capture First Place?

Filed under: Internet , Competitive Strategy , Google (GOOG) , Smartphones , Technology If we look back to the days of the search engine revolution, Google ( GOOG) built not only the most powerful search engine, but a business model based on that search engine that has made the company No. 1 in that category. The company is on the move again — and Google’s Android is leading the way. Google sees the next leg of the Internet revolution in the smart phone, tablet and e-reader market — and there’s already a fierce battle raging. Google’s Android is making inroads into the iPhone turf. How deep is the penetration? Singapore research firm Canalys said, ” Google shipped twice as many devices as Apple’s iPhone. in the fourth quarter,” capturing 33% of shipments, up from 8.7% a year ago. Continue reading Will Android Capture First Place? Will Android Capture First Place? originally appeared on BloggingStocks on Tue, 15 Feb 2011 10:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Permalink | Email this | Comments

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Card Readers to Generate $11 Billion in Sales

Filed in Apple, AT T, E Reader, o, South African Gold, Spot Gold by on February 14, 2011 0 Comments
Card Readers to Generate $11 Billion in Sales

Filed under: Intuit Inc (INTU) , VeriFone Holdings (PAY) , Smartphones , Technology New technology spawns still more technology. Such is the case with smart phones. Entrepreneurs have found a way to facilitate buying with your smart phone. Companies like Intuit ( INTU ) and VeriFone ( PAY ) have created a card reader that can be inserted into your iPhone ( AAPL ) or other smart phone. Then you can swipe a credit card through the reader and use it to make online purchases. The potential of this new technology is enormous. Analysts estimate that the industry will grow to $11 billion this year. Continue reading Card Readers to Generate $11 Billion in Sales Card Readers to Generate $11 Billion in Sales originally appeared on BloggingStocks on Mon, 14 Feb 2011 09:40:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Permalink | Email this | Comments

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Market Wrap-Up for Feb.3 (EL, NEM, YUM, K, CME, CVS, more)

The markets got off to a negative start today, but within the averages were several names that stood out on the upside, helping push the averages green by the market close. Screaming higher today were shares of Estee Lauder ( EL ) after the cosmetics giant beat estimates on its earnings report and raised guidance significantly. This is a name we have been watching closely and one we will consider on decent pullbacks. Also moving up on earnings-related stories were Ross Stores ( ROST ), Yum Brands ( YUM ), and Kellogg ( K ). On the flipside, earnings results hurt stocks like Ameriprise Financial ( AMP ), CME Group ( CME ), and CVS Caremark ( CVS ). Holding the averages back today a bit are energy plays that are seeing some red following multi-day gains. Newmont Mining ( NEM ) announced an acquisition this morning of Fronteer Gold ( FRG ). I will be watching the mining companies closely to see if this can get gold and sliver out of their recent slump. As I get prepared to do a national radio campaign where I will be interviewed on about 20-25 different national affiliates (I will give readers a heads up whenever I know I will be going on somewhere) regarding my “Be a Dividend Millionaire” book and of course our Dividend.com business, I want to reflect on my initial foray into the media world. About two years ago, I reached out to a local NBC affiliate to talk about what was happening in the economy and it was quite an enlightening experience. I learned some lessons early on about the media biz and business news from a local affiliate standpoint. First of all, I went in cold with no experience or training, and that likely showed my first few times on the air (fortunately no Cindy Brady-style freezing when the on-air light came on). After that, I seemed to find my groove. Unfortunately at the time, the economy was in the dumps and there was little I could do to sugarcoat the situation. Being a tell-it-like-it-is person is not something that broadcasters enjoy, depending on the station and people you deal with. In my case, my segments were focused on avoiding layoffs and when will the economy rebound. I had little in the way I was able to contribute from an investing standpoint (not my call, but the station manager at the time). I also learned about writing your own segments, which is what I had to do. The anchor would literally receive my notes for the first time as I was being seated up at the anchor desk a minute before going on the air. Can you say chaotic? I stopped doing the segments as there was a bit too much demand on what was needed for me to produce the segments, along with being held back from showcasing my investing expertise. I am excited to begin working with a top media/PR person who has worked with some key names in the financial and publishing space. I hope I am able to keep things real during my upcoming media appearances, and won’t be forced…

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Answering Krugman on Austrian Economic Theory

Answering Krugman on Austrian Economic Theory

I still get the sense that Krugman truly doesn’t understand the Austrian position. For example, he asks, “Why is there overwhelming evidence that when central banks decide to slow the economy, the economy does indeed slow?” But because the Austrian theory says the bust occurs when the central bank backs off and allows interest rates to rise toward their “correct” level, this is hardly a problem. In fact, if central banks couldn’t slow the economy, as an Austrian economist I would be worried about my theory. Krugman also poses questions concerning (price) inflation rates and the connection between nominal and real GDP. But I think he is conflating the Austrian theory with a purely “real” business-cycle theory. Austrians understand that monetary influences can have real effects. To repeat, that is the very essence of the Mises-Hayek theory. Although most of Krugman’s objections are due to his unfamiliarity with the actual Austrian theory, I think one source of confusion came from the particular illustration I used in my article. First let’s set the context by quoting Krugman : “So what is the essence of this Austrian story? Basically, it says that what we call an economic boom is actually something like China’s disastrous Great Leap Forward, which led to a temporary surge in consumption but only at the expense of degradation of the country’s underlying productive capacity. And the unemployment that follows is a result of that degradation: there’s simply nothing useful for the unemployed workers to do. “I like this story, and there are probably other cases besides China 1958–1961 to which it applies. But what reason do we have to think that it has anything to do with the business cycles we actually see in market economies?” First, I should say I’m glad that Krugman at least concedes that (his understanding of) the Austrian explanation both is theoretically possible and actually happens in the real world — coming from the guy who referred to it in 1998 as equivalent to the “phlogiston theory of fire,” this is progress! However, Krugman still doesn’t have quite the right understanding of the Austrian view of the “capital consumption” that occurs during the unsustainable boom. As I said above, on this particular issue the fault lies with the necessarily simplistic “sushi model” I used in the article that Krugman read . In that article, in order to make sure the reader really saw why Krugman (and Tyler Cowen) were overlooking something basic, I had the villagers boost their daily sushi intake even while they developed a new technology to help augment their fishing. So during their “boom,” it would have seemed to a dull villager that both consumption and investment were rising. In my fable, this was physically possible because the villagers neglected the regular maintenance of their boats…

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Why Paul Krugman Is Wrong on the Austrians

The Austrians on Capital In contrast to mainstream macro models, which either do not possess capital at all or at best denote it as a homogenous stock of size “K,” Austrian theory explicitly treats the capital structure of the economy as a complex assortment of different tools, equipment, machinery, inventories, and other goods in process. Much of the Austrian perspective is dependent on this rich view of the economy’s capital structure, and mainstream economists miss out on many of the Austrian insights when they make the “convenient” assumption that the economy has one good. (Krugman will be glad to know that yes, I can spell all this out in a formal model — and one that referee Paul Samuelson grudgingly signed off on.) Krugman and other Keynesians stress the primacy of demand: they keep pointing out that the owner of an electronics store, say, won’t have the incentive to hire more workers, and buy more inventory, if he doesn’t expect consumers will show up with money to spend on new TVs or laptops. But Austrians point out that demand per se is hardly the whole story: Regardless of how many green pieces of paper the customers have, or how much credit the store can get from the bank, it will be physically impossible for the electronics store to fill the shelves with new TVs and laptops unless the manufacturers of those items have already produced them. And in turn, the manufacturers can’t magically create TVs and laptops merely because the demand for their products picks up; they rely on other sectors in the economy having done the prior preparation as well, such as mining the necessary metals, assembling the proper amount of tractor trailers needed to ship the goods from the factory, and so on. These observations may strike some as trivial, not worthy of the consideration of serious economists. But that’s only because normally, a market economy “spontaneously” solves this tremendous coordination problem through prices and the corresponding signals of profit and loss. If someone had to centrally plan an entire economy from scratch, there would be all sorts of bottlenecks and waste — as actual experience has shown. Without the guidance of market prices, we wouldn’t observe a smoothly functioning economy, where natural resources move down the chain of production — from mining to processing to manufacturing to wholesale to retail — as neatly depicted in macro textbooks. Instead, we would see a chaotic muddle where the various interlocking processes didn’t dovetail. There would be too many hammers and not enough nails, too much perishable food and not enough refrigerated railroad cars to deliver it, and so on. The Austrians on Interest When it comes to explaining the coordinating function of market prices, Austrians assign a very important role to interest rates, for they steer …

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Market Wrap-Up for Jan.27 (QCOM, BEN, SWK, PG, CL, T, more)

Glum news out on Social Security this morning as we hear the Social Security system will run at a deficit this year and keep on running in the red until its trust funds are drained by about 2037. Congressional budget experts had expected social security to post surpluses for a few more years before permanently slipping into the red in 2016. I can’t stress enough to our readers that the time to take charge of your retirement, nest egg, or ambitions to build your own wealth — immediately! Depending on the government to provide a comfortable retirement can potentially set up many for some tough times, especially those who have saved little of what they have earned. I can’t stop saying enough that investing in dividend-paying stocks can be a huge source of extra income that you can get started building today. Many of our readers have already been putting the wheels in motion and are not waiting for rude awakening. I wanted to make a quick note regarding the website. We are in the process of upgrading our server for Dividend.com (need to accommodate the larger audience that continues to head our way – it’s a good thing!), so the site could be down sporadically at various times over the next day. We apologize for any inconvenience this may be causing. We’ll be sure to work as hard as ever to make it up with our stock research and recommendations. I also just want to take a minute to thank the thousands of subscribers that continue to believe in our firm and the message we are delivering on a daily basis. We try to differentiate ourselves through our results and also through how we communicate. My personal style of writing is one that I hope can help anyone understand and embrace the markets. We have an amazing audience, from the novice investor to the many wealth/hedge fund managers that use our service. …

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How We’re Profiting from the Legal Manipulation of this Stock

Filed in BP, E Reader, Gold, GOld juniors, Gold Market, o, shares by on January 17, 2011 0 Comments

Back on January 6, we told you about a simple system that allows you to profit from the legal manipulation of stocks . We said: Take a look at lockup expiration dates for “easier made” profits. For example, take a look at what happened to Tesla Motors (TSLA) last week. Shares just fell out of the blue, right? Not exactly… Insiders were finally allowed to sell their shares in a period known as the “unlock period,” or “lockup expiration.” The lockup is a 180-day period in which insider selling following IPO were restricted. Owners of 75 million shares could begin selling. Or, take a look at Motricity around its December 14, 2010 unlock date. It fell just as predicted. Here’s how it works… and how we profit from the “event.” When any company goes public, only a percentage of the company’s stock is offered for sale, also known as the float. The rest is held and owned by underwriters, company officers, and other insiders. Contractually, insiders can’t sell their stock for a period of time… usually six months to a year from the date of the IPO. This is commonly referred to as the lockup period and is set up to ensure that insiders cannot profit from the early trading frenzy generated by an IPO. It provides stability because insiders cannot dump their shares. But once the lockup period expires, anything goes, and insiders are allowed to sell their shares. If insiders are realizing a significant gain on an investment, they can cash out at lockup expiration, like they did with eToys in 2000, for example. Insiders sold the stock heavily from October to December 1999, flooding the stock float with shares, and forcing the stock down from an $80+ high to less than $20. Insiders cashed in, flooding the market with shares, and forcibly sent the stock price lower. Ordinary shareholders, unfamiliar with the unlock practice, are completely baffled. Share prices are dropping like a cement boot in the East River and they don’t know why. Lucky for us, they panic and dump their shares at a loss, only adding to the glut and our profit opportunities. How To Spot Lockup Expiration Opportunities However, not all unlocks are suitable for trading. Say for example, stock ABC is unlocking five million shares, but has a float of 30 million shares. The unlock of five million shares isn’t likely to negatively impact share price much. However, if said company had a float of five million and was unlocking 30 million shares, and had a toppy chart, odds are often good that the stock stands a chance at pulling back. Other times, if for example, few shares were initially sold in an IPO, an increase in the float can have a long-term positive effect on the stock. I’ve seen cases where the release of unlocked shares can make a stock more attractive, like Verticalnet in 2000. Once the lockup expiration happened, the stock went to the moon. For bearish opportunities, you want to look for …

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Life According to Apple’s Steve Jobs

Filed in Apple, BP, ceo, E Reader, Gold, GOld juniors, Gold Market, Lear, o by on January 17, 2011 0 Comments
Life According to Apple’s Steve Jobs

I was saddened to hear the news about Steve Jobs this morning. As long time readers know, I think the guy is an absolute rock star in the world of CEO’s. But as you might imagine with the Apple boss, it goes much deeper than that. You see, Steve Jobs also understands life much better than most folks. Not surprisingly, he gets that too. In fact, this is one of the best commencement speeches I have ever heard… As Jobs says: “Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life.” “Don’t be trapped by dogma, which is living with the results of other people’s thinking.” “Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice, heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.” “Stay hungry, stay foolish” Like the company he founded it is about, truth, simplicity, and the freedom to follow your own heart. Godspeed Mr. Jobs…. Related Articles: Apple: Stock of the Year Apple’s Next Evolution Apple Sets its Sights on iSpecs To learn more about Wealth Daily click here Advertisement The Options Guide Your Broker Doesn’t Want You to See… Most people think profiting from options requires years of investment experience or a seasoned stock broker. That’s why people are losing thousands of dollars everyday. Our in-house options expert Ian Cooper has put together a FREE guide detailing an options strategy that’s so easy, he’s calling them “automatic options.” Click here now to gain access to your FREE options trading guide. Life According to Apple’s Steve Jobs originally appeared in Wealth Daily . Wealth Daily is a free daily newsletter featuring contrarian investment insights and commentary.

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How to Pull in 50% in the Next Month

Filed in BP, E Reader, EPS, Gold, Gold Market, o, shares, silver, ubs by on January 6, 2011 0 Comments
How to Pull in 50% in the Next Month

“Ian, when your R-4 Trigger doesn’t pick up a good trade [in Options Trading Pit], what do you do to find trades?” was the question David K. sent in this morning. Thanks for the question David. The R-4 Trigger is one of our main trading systems… but it’s not the only one we rely on for all of our gains. With great success, we also trade on the news, trade on momentum, unlock dates, other technical events, and trade on FDA decisions months before the actual decisions are even made. While our very successful R-4 Trigger system will be relied upon heavily with Bollinger Bands, Williams % Range, candlesticks, MACD and DMI… we’d be limiting your profit potential if we didn’t have other “detectors” out there. It’s what keeps us “ahead of the herd.” Take our FDA trade, Protalix (PLX), for example. We picked this up in December 2010, awaiting momentum as we head into the February 2011 PDUFA decision. It’s already up about 45% from our $1.50 entry point. Or take our plays on the silver ETF (SLV). We chased momentum for 150% on the calls, and about 40% on half of the SLV put. Or take a look at Anadarko (APC), which we profited from several times with well-placed calls on news that no one picked up on. You see, with just one system, you’re limiting yourself. It’s why we’ve developed several systems; all of which have turned out to be very profitable. Or, as we’ve been playing with… take a look at lockup expiration dates for “easier made” profits. For example, take a look at what happened to Tesla Motors (TSLA) last week. Shares just fell out of the blue, right? Not exactly… Insiders were finally allowed to sell their shares in a period known as the “unlock period,” or “lockup expiration.” The lockup is a 180-day period in which insider selling following IPO were restricted. Owners of 75 million shares could begin selling. Or, take a look at Motricity around its December 14, 2010 unlock date. It fell just as predicted. Here’s how it works… and how we profit from the “event.” When any company goes public, only a percentage of the company’s stock is offered for sale, also known as the float. The rest is held and owned by underwriters, company officers, and other insiders. Contractually, insiders can’t sell their stock for a period of time… usually six months to a year from the date of the IPO. This is commonly referred to as the lockup period and is set up to ensure that insiders cannot profit from the early trading frenzy generated by an IPO. It provides stability because insiders cannot dump their shares. But once the lockup period expires, anything goes, and insiders are allowed to sell their shares. If insiders are realizing a significant gain on an investment, they can cash out at lockup expiration, like they did with eToys in 2000, for example. Insiders sold the stock heavily from October to December 1999, flooding the stock float with shares, and forcing the stock down from an $80+ high to less than $20. Insiders cashed in, flooding the market with shares, and forcibly sent the stock price lower. Ordinary shareholders, unfamiliar with the unlock practice, are completely baffled. Share prices are dropping like a cement boot in the East River and they don’t know why. Lucky for us, they panic and dump their shares at a loss, only adding to the glut …

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Market Wrap-Up for Dec.17 (BMO, MI, ACN, ORCL, MA, V, more)

We’re happy to announce our new Dividend ETFs section on our site today! We want to bring our subscribers a roster of ETF options for anyone considering a bit more diversification and exposure to international markets. We do not currently rate the ETFs, but do give readers the trend direction to follow. The data will be updated each day, so be sure to check it out. Also, Tom and I just wrapped up our “Top 3 Market Themes of the Week” video , so be sure to give it a look. Lots of good stuff! Some good news came out this morning for investors, as it appears the Bush tax cuts are well on their way (as we figured they would). This is one less worry for the markets at this point, but with the upward price action we have seen the last 19 months or so, any worries have been easily handled by investors. At some point this could change and it would mean the investing climate could get trickier. We’ll be sure to keep readers posted as to when we see the potential danger signs. We swapped two new names on to our recommended list this morning, while removing two previous recommendations. Be sure to check out the post if you did not read the e-mail alert we sent out this morning. Interesting news out today from Bank of Montreal ( BMO ), which is looking to acquire former TARP recipient Marshall & Ilsley ( MI ). It is a bit of a strange move for the Canadian banking play to want to buy one of the more struggling bank plays, with other banking companies in the same market cap range that are acting better from a stock price performance standpoint. Investors are none too happy, with BMO shares finishing down 7%. On the earnings front, investors cheered results from Oracle Corp ( ORCL ) and Accenture ( ACN ). These former recommendations are still on our radar and we are watching both stocks closely. Some investors were surprised there was no rebound today for credit card plays MasterCard ( MA ) and Visa ( V ) following yesterday’s big drop on debit card fee concerns. Looking ahead to next week, earnings will continue to be light, with notables such as Darden Restaurants ( DRI ), Nike ( NKE ) and Walgreen Co. ( WAG ) set to report. Be sure to catch up with our latest watchlist updates, including the new

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Value stock picks: This proven strategy can help you spot takeover candidates

Filed in BP, E Reader, o, silver by on December 14, 2010 0 Comments

Investors often ask how we have managed to recommend so many value stock picks that get taken over for big profits. In fact, some readers of our newsletters and investment services tell us that they never had a stock taken over at a profit until they began following our advice. More on the strategy that helps …

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Amazon (Nasdaq:AMZN) Soars on Citigroup (NYSE:C) Price Target, "Buy" Rating

Filed in amazon-com, citigroup, E Reader, Gold Prices, kindle, o, target, wal-mart by on November 24, 2010 0 Comments

Amazon.com (Nasdaq:AMZN) is soaring today in anticipation of a big Christmas season and the reiteration by Citigroup (NYSE:C) analyst Mark Mahaney of a “Buy” rating on the online retailer. One of the major catalysts was the “Hot 20 toys” survey which included Amazon and major competitors Wal-Mart (NYSE:WMT) and Target (NYSE:TGT). Findings were when shipping was included for the hottest toys,

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