EPS

Market Week Wrap-up

– Leading global equity indices continued floating upwards this week while the inflation drumbeat just kept getting louder. In the US, the January y/y CPI figure hit +1.6%, its highest level since last spring, and some analysts were alarmed by higher food prices creeping into CPI data sooner than expected. China’s January CPI report was lower than expected at +4.9% y/y, but markets panned the figures as heavily massaged by basket revisions. In the UK, the BoE said CPI would likely continue growing at a 4-5% clip over the short term. The World Bank released a report indicating that food prices were up 15% since October 2010 and are now only 3% away from record highs hit in 2008. Commodities moves complicated the story somewhat. While silver has pushed out to 30-year highs, there were signs that inflated soft commodity prices were beginning to unwind, with cotton and grain prices both below recent highs. Crude and gold prices have been impacted by reports that Iran is sending warships through the Suez Canal and bloody protests in Bahrain (next door to Saudi Arabia), although WTI futures were well below recent highs seen in early February. The Obama Administration unveiled its $3.73T budget proposal for 2012, including an all-time high deficit of $1.65T, reflecting the tax-cut agreement reached with Republicans in December. For 2012, the administration sees the imbalance declining to $1.1T, giving the country a record four straight years of one trillion-plus deficits. Bond prices held steady after the details were released, and Congress sharpened its knives for a budget fight. The Feb Empire Manufacturing survey hit its highest level since last June, indicating that the US manufacturing expansion seen over the last several months is continuing. On Friday there was plenty of commentary out of the G20 conference, where leaders tried mightily to achieve some concrete steps in reforming the global monetary system. Fed Chairman Bernanke took a swipe at the Chinese in his policy address to the G20, warning that nations which keep currency values low create imbalances, while the PBoC’s Zhou continued to push for a higher profile for the IMF’s Special Drawing Rights (SDRs). For the week, the DJIA rose 1.0%, the Nasdaq gained 0.9% and the S&P500 was up 1.0%. – John Deere crushed earnings and revenue targets in its Q1 report and nearly doubled its guidance for FY11 equipment sales. The firm hiked its sales guidance for its key agriculture and construction units as well, and said its Q2 revenue would blow out consensus estimates. Later in the week Caterpillar released very favorable dealer metrics for the month of January, with North America machinery sales up a whopping 58% y/y in the month. – Iron ore miner Cliffs Natural Resources reported very strong Q4 profits on a big y/y gain in iron ore pricing. The company expects global steel production to continue to grow in 2011, although it warned that spot iron ore prices are unsustainably high. Reliance Steel also blew out earnings estimates, and said pricing would remain strong at least through the first quarter of 2011. – In tech, Dell’s profit was way ahead of the consensus in its Q4 report, thanks to a big improvement in margins. The company said it believes the corporate IT…

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FedEx (FDX): Still Set to Deliver?

Filed in Bank Gold, EPS, euro, Guidance, o, ubs by on February 16, 2011 0 Comments
FedEx (FDX): Still Set to Deliver?

Filed under: Newsletters , FedEx Corp (FDX) , Stocks to Buy “It’s not too often that a company lowers its guidance and the stock rises, but such is the case with FedEx ( FDX ),” says Geoffrey Seiler . The editor of BullMarket .com explains, “The company cut its fiscal Q3 guidance; but given the terrible weather, which impacted a number of airports across the U.S. and Europe, and higher fuel costs, it was largely expected. “The package delivery firm now expects to produce adjusted EPS of 70-90 cents, down from prior guidance of 95 cents to $1.15. Analysts were expecting EPS of $1.04 for the quarter. Continue reading FedEx (FDX): Still Set to Deliver? FedEx (FDX): Still Set to Deliver? originally appeared on BloggingStocks on Wed, 16 Feb 2011 10:30:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Permalink  |  Email this  |  Comments

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Would Ben Graham Buy Apple (AAPL)?

Filed in Apple, Bank Gold, earnings, EPS, ipad, Lear, o, shares by on February 14, 2011 0 Comments
Would Ben Graham Buy Apple (AAPL)?

Filed under: Apple Inc (AAPL) , Newsletters , Stocks to Buy “Is Apple (( AAPL ) undervalued? We expect the company’s earnings to grow at a rapid 24% pace during the next five years,” says J. Royden Ward who believe the tech stock meets the criteria for a long-term value investment. The editor of Cabot Benjamin Graham Value Letter explains, “At 14.7 times our one-year forward EPS estimate, shares are clearly undervalued. Indeed, we consider AAPL to be low risk. “Apple develops, manufactures and markets personal computers and consumer electronic products. Exciting new products portend continued rapid growth in future years. Continue reading Would Ben Graham Buy Apple (AAPL)? Would Ben Graham Buy Apple (AAPL)? originally appeared on BloggingStocks on Mon, 14 Feb 2011 10:20:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Permalink  |  Email this  |  Comments

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Market Wrap-Up for Feb.10 (ALL, PEP, PRU, WFMI, WMT, T, more)

I was reading more of the major Harris Poll that was released a few days back and a startling revelation that just floored me was 41% of young people between ages 18 and 33 say their personal savings is mostly in bank savings accounts and CDs. This is not a smart move, period! The media did a great job of scaring many out of the markets 18-24 months ago, and the impact on the younger generation could be quite dangerous if they continue to just “break even” with low yield investments. This ultra-conservative nature is not just going to take a toll on younger investors, but older investors as well. look at the latest annuity sales, which jumped 24% in January 2011 from the previous year. What many investors don’t realize is that now is simply a terrible time to buy annuities, because their returns are severely limited in today’s low interest rate environment. Annuities are fixed income investments offered by life insurance companies. In short, you give the insurer your money, and they make monthly payments to you over a specified period of time. There’s nothing wrong with annuities per se, but the timing for buying annuities is extremely important. In general, as …

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Coca-Cola’s Earnings Surge

Filed in acquisitions, Coca Cola, earnings, EPS, New Gold, o, revenue, Spot Gold by on February 10, 2011 0 Comments
Coca-Cola’s Earnings Surge

Filed under: Earnings Reports , Coca-Cola (KO) , PepsiCo (PEP) Last year, Coca-Cola ( KO ) acquired Coca-Cola Enterprises’ North American bottling operations. In addition, volume in North America rose 3%, excluding acquisitions and the currency impacts. These two factors gave the company an outstanding quarter. The company has taken market share from its rival PepsiCo ( PEP ). Coca-Cola reported Wednesday earnings of $5.77 billion, or $2.46 a share, up from $1.54, or 66 cents per share, a year ago, according to The Wall Street Journal . Excluding benefits from bottling acquisition, earnings were 72 cents a share. Revenues increased 40% to $10.5 billion, and were up 45% excluding currency impacts. Gross margins fell to 59.2% from 64.7%. Continue reading Coca-Cola’s Earnings Surge Coca-Cola’s Earnings Surge originally appeared on BloggingStocks on Thu, 10 Feb 2011 10:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Permalink  |  Email this  |  Comments

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Market Wrap-Up for Feb.9 (RL, DIS, AGU, IR, CSC, NYX, NOK, AAPL, more)

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke was on the hot seat today as he gave his annual Washington presentations. With the markets being significantly higher than they were this time last year, he was certainly feeling better about some of the recent data. Some of his statements pointed to increased evidence that a self-sustaining recovery in consumer and business spending may be taking hold. Also, real consumer spending rose at an annual rate of more than 4 percent in the fourth quarter. There is no question that we have been seeing economic stabilization, and the markets have certainly been pricing stocks as if the lift can be sustained. We actually made some ratings changes this morning, removing four names from our recommended list. We continue to see opportunities in the market, but we are also aware that some names may just not have the risk/reward profile we are searching for, so we need to make changes when we see fit. You can check out the post if you did not read the e-mail alert we sent out to Dividend.com Premium members earlier. The markets were moving sideways early on, but some sellers did show up in certain areas, especially the commodity names. Earnings were in play today with buyers jumping at positive news from Polo Ralph Lauren ( RL ), Walt Disney ( DIS ), Syngenta ( SYT ) and Agrium ( AGU ). On the flip side, it wasn’t a great day for shares of Computer Sciences ( CSC ) or Ingersoll-Rand ( IR ) following both companies’ less-than-stellar results. Also, shares of NYSE Euronext ( NYX ) were halted for some time, but then popped higher when the stock was released for trading on reports the exchange was involved in merger talks with the Deutsche Börse. Interesting story making the rounds this morning about Nokia’s ( NOK ) CEO sending out a reality check memo overnight to everyone in the company. The memo details how the company has lost its way, with rivals Apple ( AAPL ) and Google ( GOOG ) eating their lunch. It’s a real admission that change needs to happen quickly or the company’s future could quickly dim further. I couldn’t help but think of how this relates to the many people that still today have not taken the financial steps to safeguard their later years (whether you are 5,10,20,or 30 …

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Zillow: Home Values Lose Another $2 Trillion

Filed in BP, economy, EPS, Gold, GOld juniors, Gold Market, housing-market, Lear, o, revenue by on February 9, 2011 0 Comments
Zillow: Home Values Lose Another $2 Trillion

Anybody that thinks housing has reached a bottom needs to have their head examined. If you doubt that just ask the fine folks at Beazer Homes (NYSE:BZH) who reported a loss of $48.8 million, or 66 cents a share, down more than 200% from a $48 million, or $1.17 per share, income a year earlier. That dismal effort came on revenue that plummeted 48% to $110.3 million from $213.1 million just a year earlier. Meanwhile the spring is really not looking that much better. Beazer reported a total of 527 home closings and 540 new orders during the period, down 43.6% and down 23.9% respectively. Of course, that what happens Uncle Sam steps out of the mix with tax goodies and rebates—the market falls apart. Because the truth is despite historically low interest rates, the demand for homes of all types remains at exceptionally low levels. That’s true no matter what Lawrence Yun says. The end result is falling prices and more borrowers left underwater…. From Bloomberg by John Gittleson entitled: Home-Price Drop Leaves 27% of U.S. Owners Underwater on Loans “ The number of U.S. homes worth less than their outstanding mortgage jumped in the fourth quarter as prices fell and lenders seized fewer properties from delinquent borrowers, according to Zillow Inc. About 15.7 million homeowners had negative equity, also known as being underwater, at the end of the year, up from 13.9 million in the previous three months, the Seattle-based real estate information company said in a report today. The total represented 27 percent of mortgaged single-family homes, the highest in Zillow data dating to the first quarter of 2009. Home prices are declining as foreclosed properties sell at discounts and unemployment at 9 percent limits buyer demand. Values will fall as much as 5 percent this year, putting more homeowners underwater, before finding a floor as the economy improves, said Stan Humphries, Zillow’s chief economist. “ These seem like fairly grim numbers,” Humphries said in a telephone interview. “We’re still expecting a bottom in home values later this year. And this, if anything, makes me a bit more confident because I’m seeing very large corrections now, which means the market can start to repair itself.” The median value for a U.S. single-family home was $175,200 in the fourth quarter, down 2.6 percent from the end of September and 5.9 percent from a year earlier, according to Zillow. Values have fallen 27 percent from the June 2006 peak. Las Vegas led the nation in …

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All That Jazz (JAZZ): Biotech Targets Narcolepsy, OCD and Anxiety

Filed in Bank Gold, EPS, o, revenue, target by on February 8, 2011 0 Comments
All That Jazz (JAZZ): Biotech Targets Narcolepsy, OCD and Anxiety

Filed under: Newsletters , Stocks to Buy “The visible growth story at Jazz Pharmaceuticals ( JAZZ ) is the narcolepsy treatment Xyrem, which accounts for 85% of revenues,” says growth stock specialist Mike Cintolo . The editor of Cabot Top Ten Weekly Report explains, “But Jazz has great potential to make big money with other drugs too-all of which focus on the chemistry of the brain. “Thanks to patents, Jazz has a decade to run with Xyrem before generic competitors can enter the market. Meanwhile, its drugs have potential to treat and/or cure obsessive-compulsive disorders, anxiety disorders, fibromyalgia, epilepsy and restless leg syndrome. Continue reading All That Jazz (JAZZ): Biotech Targets Narcolepsy, OCD and Anxiety All That Jazz (JAZZ): Biotech Targets Narcolepsy, OCD and Anxiety originally appeared on BloggingStocks on Tue, 08 Feb 2011 11:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Permalink  |  Email this  |  Comments

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Kellogg Upgraded to “Outperform” at Wells Fargo (K)

Cereal maker Kellogg Company ( K ) on Friday saw its rating and price target boosted on Friday by analysts at Wells Fargo. The firm said it upgraded K from “Market Perform” to “Outperform,” while boosting its valuation range from $51-$53 to $58-$60. That new target implies up to a 14% upside to the stock’s Thursday closing price of $52.52. A Wells analyst commented, “We expect Kellogg’s shares to appreciate as earnings surprise to the upside driven by a faster-than-expected recovery in its core N.A. retail cereal business. Kellogg enters 2011 with a 25% increase in new products versus 2009-2010 levels, increased investment in its supply chain, easy comparisons and list price increases already implemented to help cover surging input costs…our 2011E EPS to $3.50 from $3.40 (versus $3.46 consensus) and our 2012 estimate from $3.75 to $3.85 (versus $3.79 consensus) as a result.” Kellogg shares posted modest gains in premarket trading Friday. The Bottom Line We have been recommending shares of Kellogg ( K ) since Nov.3, 2010, when the stock was trading at $49.69. The company has a 3.08% dividend yield, based on last night’s closing stock price of $52.52. Kellogg Company ( K ) is a “Recommended” dividend stock, holding a Dividend.com DARS™ Rating of 3.5 out of 5 stars. Be sure to visit our complete recommended list of the Best Dividend Stocks , as well as a detailed explanation of our ratings system here .

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Avery Dennison Beats on Revs – Analyst Blog

Filed in AIG, BP, EPS, Gold Investing, o, silver by on February 2, 2011 0 Comments

Avery Dennison reported 4Q10 adjusted EPS of 98 cents, matching the Zacks Consensus Estimate.

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Why Paul Krugman Is Wrong on the Austrians

The Austrians on Capital In contrast to mainstream macro models, which either do not possess capital at all or at best denote it as a homogenous stock of size “K,” Austrian theory explicitly treats the capital structure of the economy as a complex assortment of different tools, equipment, machinery, inventories, and other goods in process. Much of the Austrian perspective is dependent on this rich view of the economy’s capital structure, and mainstream economists miss out on many of the Austrian insights when they make the “convenient” assumption that the economy has one good. (Krugman will be glad to know that yes, I can spell all this out in a formal model — and one that referee Paul Samuelson grudgingly signed off on.) Krugman and other Keynesians stress the primacy of demand: they keep pointing out that the owner of an electronics store, say, won’t have the incentive to hire more workers, and buy more inventory, if he doesn’t expect consumers will show up with money to spend on new TVs or laptops. But Austrians point out that demand per se is hardly the whole story: Regardless of how many green pieces of paper the customers have, or how much credit the store can get from the bank, it will be physically impossible for the electronics store to fill the shelves with new TVs and laptops unless the manufacturers of those items have already produced them. And in turn, the manufacturers can’t magically create TVs and laptops merely because the demand for their products picks up; they rely on other sectors in the economy having done the prior preparation as well, such as mining the necessary metals, assembling the proper amount of tractor trailers needed to ship the goods from the factory, and so on. These observations may strike some as trivial, not worthy of the consideration of serious economists. But that’s only because normally, a market economy “spontaneously” solves this tremendous coordination problem through prices and the corresponding signals of profit and loss. If someone had to centrally plan an entire economy from scratch, there would be all sorts of bottlenecks and waste — as actual experience has shown. Without the guidance of market prices, we wouldn’t observe a smoothly functioning economy, where natural resources move down the chain of production — from mining to processing to manufacturing to wholesale to retail — as neatly depicted in macro textbooks. Instead, we would see a chaotic muddle where the various interlocking processes didn’t dovetail. There would be too many hammers and not enough nails, too much perishable food and not enough refrigerated railroad cars to deliver it, and so on. The Austrians on Interest When it comes to explaining the coordinating function of market prices, Austrians assign a very important role to interest rates, for they steer …

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Kraft Foods’ Estimates Cut at Credit Suisse on Cost Concerns (KFT)

Filed in dividend, earnings, EPS, Gold Bullion prices, o, outperform, shares, target by on January 31, 2011 0 Comments

Packaged foods maker Kraft Foods Inc. ( KFT ) on Monday saw its earnings estimates lowered through 2012 by analysts at Credit Suisse. The firm said it cut its 2011 and 2012 EPS estimates for KFT to $2.23 and $2.45, respectively. Credit Suisse cited rising costs for the move, as many food sellers have been feeling the crunch. Still, the analyst maintained its “Outperform” rating and $35 price target on KFT, which implies a 15% upside to the stock’s Friday closing price of $30.53. Kraft Foods shares were mostly flat in premarket trading Monday. The Bottom Line We have been recommending shares of Kraft Foods ( KFT ) since May 5, 2009, when the stock was trading at $24.26. The company has a 3.80% dividend yield, based on Friday’s closing stock price of $30.53. Kraft Foods Inc. ( KFT ) is a “Recommended” dividend stock, holding a Dividend.com DARS™ Rating of 3.5 out of 5 stars. Be sure to visit our complete recommended list of the Best Dividend Stocks , as well as a detailed explanation of our ratings system here .

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