silver

Sweet Monday Mornings

Filed in AIG, BP, o, silver by on February 28, 2011 0 Comments

Remarkable isn’t it? It has almost become like clockwork – I’ve never seen a pattern continue like this at a 80%+ type of success rate. Another wonderful surge in futures between 6 AM and 9 AM on a Monday morning, for no particular reason (not ev…

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Bullion vs Mining Stocks | Financial News

Filed in African Gold, Bank Gold, Gold, o, platinum, silver by on February 19, 2011 0 Comments

I discuss the pros and cons of owning mining stocks vs bullion and give my opinion on 401ks. seekingalpha.com I looked at the. … It was not a pretty picture as it was revealed that a basket of silver stocks we track in my newsletter had underperformed silver by 27%” www.marketoracle.co.uk “The Canadian mining stock mutual funds lost between 25% and 55% in 2008, whereas BMG BullionFund, a mutual fund that holds physical gold , silver and platinum bullion , lost only 4%” …

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Silver Near a 31-Year High

Silver Near a 31-Year High

Filed under: Major Movement , Competitive Strategy , Barrick Gold (ABX) , Commodities , Federal Reserve Back in the late 1970s, the Hunt brothers from Texas tried to corner the silver market . That drove prices to $48 an ounce. Now, 31 years later, silver is shooting higher again. The March silver futures contract closed at $32.296 per ounce , up 72 cents. Since gold is expensive, investors are turning to silver to hedge against inflation. Many fear that the Federal Reserve will not be able to control the spike in commodity prices. The Fed is buying $600 billion of treasuries and keeping interest rates near zero. Continue reading Silver Near a 31-Year High Silver Near a 31-Year High originally appeared on BloggingStocks on Sat, 19 Feb 2011 12:50:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Permalink | Email this | Comments

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Market Week Wrap-up

– Leading global equity indices continued floating upwards this week while the inflation drumbeat just kept getting louder. In the US, the January y/y CPI figure hit +1.6%, its highest level since last spring, and some analysts were alarmed by higher food prices creeping into CPI data sooner than expected. China’s January CPI report was lower than expected at +4.9% y/y, but markets panned the figures as heavily massaged by basket revisions. In the UK, the BoE said CPI would likely continue growing at a 4-5% clip over the short term. The World Bank released a report indicating that food prices were up 15% since October 2010 and are now only 3% away from record highs hit in 2008. Commodities moves complicated the story somewhat. While silver has pushed out to 30-year highs, there were signs that inflated soft commodity prices were beginning to unwind, with cotton and grain prices both below recent highs. Crude and gold prices have been impacted by reports that Iran is sending warships through the Suez Canal and bloody protests in Bahrain (next door to Saudi Arabia), although WTI futures were well below recent highs seen in early February. The Obama Administration unveiled its $3.73T budget proposal for 2012, including an all-time high deficit of $1.65T, reflecting the tax-cut agreement reached with Republicans in December. For 2012, the administration sees the imbalance declining to $1.1T, giving the country a record four straight years of one trillion-plus deficits. Bond prices held steady after the details were released, and Congress sharpened its knives for a budget fight. The Feb Empire Manufacturing survey hit its highest level since last June, indicating that the US manufacturing expansion seen over the last several months is continuing. On Friday there was plenty of commentary out of the G20 conference, where leaders tried mightily to achieve some concrete steps in reforming the global monetary system. Fed Chairman Bernanke took a swipe at the Chinese in his policy address to the G20, warning that nations which keep currency values low create imbalances, while the PBoC’s Zhou continued to push for a higher profile for the IMF’s Special Drawing Rights (SDRs). For the week, the DJIA rose 1.0%, the Nasdaq gained 0.9% and the S&P500 was up 1.0%. – John Deere crushed earnings and revenue targets in its Q1 report and nearly doubled its guidance for FY11 equipment sales. The firm hiked its sales guidance for its key agriculture and construction units as well, and said its Q2 revenue would blow out consensus estimates. Later in the week Caterpillar released very favorable dealer metrics for the month of January, with North America machinery sales up a whopping 58% y/y in the month. – Iron ore miner Cliffs Natural Resources reported very strong Q4 profits on a big y/y gain in iron ore pricing. The company expects global steel production to continue to grow in 2011, although it warned that spot iron ore prices are unsustainably high. Reliance Steel also blew out earnings estimates, and said pricing would remain strong at least through the first quarter of 2011. – In tech, Dell’s profit was way ahead of the consensus in its Q4 report, thanks to a big improvement in margins. The company said it believes the corporate IT…

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EURUSD Weekly Summary: Bullish flag broken, Euro could continue the bullish run

Filed in euro, Gold, o, silver by on February 19, 2011 0 Comments
EURUSD Weekly Summary: Bullish flag broken, Euro could continue the bullish run

EURUSD Weekly Summary: Bullish flag broken, Euro could continue the bullish run to 1.3860 or higher The EURUSD slipped below 1.3500 this week, but found a good support around 1.3420 area before bounced significantly higher and hit 1.3714 on Friday. As you can see on my daily chart below, the bullish flag is broken out to the upside, suggests potential bullish continuation scenario which started from 1.2873. This fact not only open the door for further bullish run testing 1.3800 – 1.3860 key resistance area, but could create a bigger bullish scenario testing 1.4200 – 1.4300. Immediate support is seen around 1.3650 followed by 1.3550. A break below 1.3550 could cancel the bullish flag upside scenario re-testing 1.3420 key support level. Have a great weekend and see you guys next week.

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TD Ameritrade (AMTD) Joins GE (GE), Coke (KO), McDonalds (MCD), Visa (V), AT&T (T) As USOC Sponsor

TD Ameritrade Holding Corp. (NASDAQ:AMTD) has reportedly signed on to be a sponsor for the U.S. Olympic Committee, the first in the online broker segment to do so.They will join others like Acer, Coca-Cola (NYSE:KO), Visa (NYSE:V), Anheuser-Busch (NYSE:BUD), AT&T (NYSE:T), Dow Chemical (NYSE:DOW), Atos Origin, BMW Group NA, BP (NYSE:BP), General Electric (NYSE:GE), McDonald’s (NYSE:MCD), Procter

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Gold, Silver Prices Today Rise to 30-Year High on Unrest in Middle East

Ongoing unrest in the middle east is causing investors to push up the price of gold and silver today, with silver reaching a 30-year high, and palladium also rising to its highest levels in 10 years.Physical demand for gold in the middle east has been skyrocketing, increasing 39 percent in the fourth quarter, according to World Gold Council, as locals in the region see the potential for

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Urban Magnets for Disaster

Filed in BP, deflation, economy, Ford, Gold, inflation, o, silver, ubs, US Dollar by on February 18, 2011 0 Comments

When it comes to bad stuff the sky’s the limit. It’s gonna happen, eventually…one way or another. And it could be real bad. And when bad stuff happens, you’re better off being somewhere else. Where? Generally, bad stuff seems to happen most often in cities. Why is that? Cities are where most people live. It is where governments are. And it is where the labor force is most specialized. There are no subsistence farmers living in cities. Nor do urban populations “live off the land.” Instead, they depend on complex networks of commerce. The typical city dweller produces neither food nor energy. He sits all day in an office — completely dependent on others to provide power and food. Then, he goes home — still completely dependent on the division of labor for his most important needs. Progress can be described as the elaboration of the division of labor. In man’s most primitive state, specialization is extremely limited. From what we’ve been told, the early man was the hunter. Early woman gathered…that’s about the extent of it. As the tribe grows larger, specialization increases. One person might tend the fire. Another might be in charge of making clothes or arrows. The advent of sedentary agriculture and towns caused a big leap forward in human progress and, not coincidentally, the division of labor. Some townspeople went out to tend the fields. Others began to focus on woodworking…or iron mongering…or making weapons…or clothes. Some played cards and hung around at bars. There was soon a homebuilding industry…and, not long after, merchants, prostitutes and bankers…and even shyster lawyers and tax collectors. As the division of labor expanded, the average person became richer…and more dependent on others. In order to eat, someone else had to plant…and till…and harvest…and hunt…and gather. And then, when agriculture became mechanized, he depended on faraway people who produced oil and gasoline…and people who built …

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Gallup: The Unemployment Rate is 10%

Gallup:  The Unemployment Rate is 10%

Jobs…jobs…jobs… I’m beginning to sound like a broken record but it’s true: This economy is going nowhere unless we start creating some jobs. As for the recent drop in the unemployment rate to 9.0%, I’m not buying it since it comes from Uncle Sam. The real figure is likely closer to what Gallup is reporting today… From by Dennis Jacobe entitled: Gallup Finds U.S. Unemployment Up to 10% in Mid-February “Unemployment, as measured by Gallup without seasonal adjustment, hit 10.0% in mid-February — up from 9.8% at the end of January. Underemployment, in which Gallup combines part-time workers wanting full-time work with the U.S. unemployment rate, surged in mid-February to 19.6% — mostly as a result of the sharp increase in those working part time but wanting full-time work. Underemployment now stands at basically the same place as it did a year ago (19.8%). The unemployment rate in mid-February is 0.8 percentage points lower than it was at this time a year ago, compared with a 1.1-point improvement at the end of January. This suggests that jobs are less available now than they were in January. More troubling, however, is the surge in underemployment. On this broader basis, current job conditions are barely improved from what they were at this time last year. Essentially, what has happened over the past year is that some people who were unemployed got part-time jobs but are still looking for full-time work. This is not much to show for a year in which many macro-economic indicators showed improvement. This is likely why Gallup’s self-reported spending

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ABC Bullion Blog: Stocks fall, oil, gold, silver rise as Mideast …

Filed in Bank Gold, Gold, o, silver by on February 16, 2011 0 Comments

In what may become the common theme of 2011 yesterday stocks fell while Brent Crude topped $104 and gold and silver headed back to their former highs of last year. The cause? More unrest in the Middle East. …

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The Incredible Shrinking Middle Class

Filed in BP, Debt, economy, Ford, Gold, GOld juniors, inflation, Lear, o, recession, silver by on February 16, 2011 0 Comments
The Incredible Shrinking Middle Class

Here’s a copy of the chart of the day.As you might have suspected, the rich get richer while everyone else basically gets to tread water. The article that follows once again drives home a point I have been harping on for years now: The Middle Class in a state of terminal decline. And when it vanishes for good, America will be a very different place. If you ask me, in a lot of ways it already is…. From CNNMONEY by Annalyn Censky entitled: How the middle class became the underclass “ Are you better off than your parents? Probably not if you’re in the middle class. Incomes for 90% of Americans have been stuck in neutral, and it’s not just because of the Great Recession. Middle-class incomes have been stagnant for at least a generation, while the wealthiest tier has surged ahead at lighting speed. In 1988, the income of an average American taxpayer was $33,400, adjusted for inflation. Fast forward 20 years, and not much had changed: The average income was still just $33,000 in 2008, according to IRS data. Experts point to some of the usual suspects — like technology and globalization — to explain the widening gap between the haves and have-nots. One major pull on the working man was the decline of unions and other labor protections, said Bill Rodgers, a former chief economist for the Labor Department, now a professor at Rutgers University. International competition is another factor. While globalization has lifted millions out of poverty in developing nations, it hasn’t exactly been a win for middle class workers in the U.S. Factory workers have seen many of their jobs shipped to other countries where labor is cheaper, putting more downward pressure on American wages. “As we became more connected to China, that poses the question of whether our wages are being set in Beijing,” Rodgers said. Finding it harder to compete with cheaper manufacturing costs abroad, the U.S. has emerged as primarily a services-producing economy. That trend has created a cultural shift in the job skills American employers are looking for. As a result, the disparity between the wages for college educated workers versus high school grads has widened significantly since the 1980s. In 1980, workers …

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Chinese Citizens Are Hungry for More Gold

Filed in commodities, Gold, Gold Prices, New Gold, o, silver, South African Gold by on February 16, 2011 0 Comments
Chinese Citizens Are Hungry for More Gold

Filed under: China , Commodities China is allowing its citizens to buy physical gold bars . This new program is unleashing an unbridled demand for the metal. The program works this way: The Industrial & Commercial Bank of China (ICBC), China’s largest, sells the bars to customers at real-time prices. Persons who own the bars can resell them to the bank. To give you an insight into the magnitude of these sales, here are a few statistics. The ICBC sold 7 tons of bullion in January alone. In all of 2010, sales were only 15 tons. Continue reading Chinese Citizens Are Hungry for More Gold Chinese Citizens Are Hungry for More Gold originally appeared on BloggingStocks on Wed, 16 Feb 2011 12:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Permalink | Email this | Comments

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