Blinder Understates Cost of Carbon Tax

Filed in AMAG, BP, deflation, economy, job creation, lead, Lear, New Gold, o, Spot Gold by on February 4, 2011 0 Comments

In a recent article in the Wall Street Journal , Alan Blinder listed numerous alleged benefits of a phased-in carbon tax. Out of his entire column, he devoted a single sentence to the possible downside of his plan when he wrote, “No one likes to pay higher taxes.” A more balanced assessment shows that a carbon tax presents very real dangers, even if we rely on the same economic analysis that so enthralled Blinder. Spurring Innovation through Higher Taxes? Here’s Blinder explaining the economic benefits of a carbon tax that starts out low, but will eventually become quite steep: “Once America’s entrepreneurs and corporate executives see lucrative opportunities from carbon-saving devices and technologies, they will start investing right away — and in ways that make the most economic sense. I don’t know whether all this innovation will lead to 80% of our electricity being generated by clean energy sources in 2035, which is the president’s goal. But I can hardly wait to witness the outpouring of ideas it would unleash. The next Steve Jobs, Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg are waiting in the wings to make themselves rich by helping the environment.” We should also be clear that Blinder’s argument for job creation does not rely on the “negative externalities” of carbon emissions. Earlier in the piece, he made a list of the “few nice side effects” that would result from a carbon tax: “reducing our trade deficit, making our economy more efficient, ameliorating global warming …” Because he puts global warming at third in the list, we see that there is nothing peculiar to greenhouse gases behind his main argument for job creation. No, Blinder is making the simple observation that if the government imposes artificial costs on the…

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Blinder Understates Cost of Carbon Tax

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