Tag: economy

Iceland president rejects Icesave bill

Filed in AT T, Bank Gold, economy, Gold Spot Market, o by on February 20, 2011 0 Comments

The President of Iceland, Olafur Ragnar Grimsson, has decided that the latest Icesave bill will be sent to a public referendum.

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Gold, Silver Prices Today Rise to 30-Year High on Unrest in Middle East

Ongoing unrest in the middle east is causing investors to push up the price of gold and silver today, with silver reaching a 30-year high, and palladium also rising to its highest levels in 10 years.Physical demand for gold in the middle east has been skyrocketing, increasing 39 percent in the fourth quarter, according to World Gold Council, as locals in the region see the potential for

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Taiwan Semiconductor (TSM): Tech Turnaround

Filed in Bank Gold, economy, lead, o by on February 18, 2011 0 Comments
Taiwan Semiconductor (TSM): Tech Turnaround

Filed under: China , Newsletters , Stocks to Buy “Taiwan’s economy and its stock market should post solid growth in 2011; we also see warming relations between the island of Taiwan and mainland China,” suggests global specialist Yiannis Mostrous . The editor of The Silk Road Investor explains, “Technology should be a major beneficiary of these near-term themes and Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing ( TSM ) is our favorite stock for exposure to the technology turnaround. “Demand for notebook computers remains solid and mobile phones are expected to sell strongly during the Chinese New Year holiday this week, which will lead to inventory restocking. Continue reading Taiwan Semiconductor (TSM): Tech Turnaround Taiwan Semiconductor (TSM): Tech Turnaround originally appeared on BloggingStocks on Fri, 18 Feb 2011 13:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Permalink | Email this | Comments

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Fidelity Select Healthcare (FSPHX): The Right Prescription

Filed in Bank Gold, economy, o by on February 17, 2011 0 Comments
Fidelity Select Healthcare (FSPHX): The Right Prescription

Filed under: Newsletters , Mutual Funds “We own a healthy dose of Fidelity Select Healthcare ( FSPHX ) in each of our model portfolios,” says fund expert Jim Lowell . The editor of Fidelity Investor explains, “Manager Eddie Yoon and I caught up this month. His command of the sector and his growth-oriented discipline continue to serve us well on both our risk-adjusted and real return fronts/ “Of course, healthcare (representing nearly 16% of our total GDP) is unlike any other sector in the S&P. It is so diversified and global, so interrelated to technology, manufacturing, and R&D, so dependent upon delivering real goods and services for consumer consumption, that it is almost an economy unto itself. Continue reading Fidelity Select Healthcare (FSPHX): The Right Prescription Fidelity Select Healthcare (FSPHX): The Right Prescription originally appeared on BloggingStocks on Thu, 17 Feb 2011 13:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Permalink | Email this | Comments

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Chinese Citizens Are Hungry for More Gold

Filed in commodities, Gold, Gold Prices, New Gold, o, silver, South African Gold by on February 16, 2011 0 Comments
Chinese Citizens Are Hungry for More Gold

Filed under: China , Commodities China is allowing its citizens to buy physical gold bars . This new program is unleashing an unbridled demand for the metal. The program works this way: The Industrial & Commercial Bank of China (ICBC), China’s largest, sells the bars to customers at real-time prices. Persons who own the bars can resell them to the bank. To give you an insight into the magnitude of these sales, here are a few statistics. The ICBC sold 7 tons of bullion in January alone. In all of 2010, sales were only 15 tons. Continue reading Chinese Citizens Are Hungry for More Gold Chinese Citizens Are Hungry for More Gold originally appeared on BloggingStocks on Wed, 16 Feb 2011 12:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Permalink | Email this | Comments

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Brent Crude at $104 per Barrel on Spreading Mideast Unrest

Filed in commodities, Gold, Lear, New Gold, o, Spot Gold by on February 15, 2011 0 Comments
Brent Crude at $104 per Barrel on Spreading Mideast Unrest

Filed under: China , Middle East , Commodities , Oil When it comes to the biggest threat to world economies, oil scarcity is second only to nuclear war. What started in Tunisia, then spread to Egypt has now spreading to Bahrain and Iran, where protesters are clashing with police. In Iran, lawmakers are threatening death to protesters. The fear of chaos spreading across the Middle East has sent the oil market into overdrive. Brent crude traded at $104 per barrel Tuesday. Continue reading Brent Crude at $104 per Barrel on Spreading Mideast Unrest Brent Crude at $104 per Barrel on Spreading Mideast Unrest originally appeared on BloggingStocks on Tue, 15 Feb 2011 11:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Permalink | Email this | Comments

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A Self-Employed Carpenter’s Continued Thoughts on the Future

Filed in BP, Debt, deflation, economy, Gold, inflation, Lear, o, silver, US Dollar by on February 11, 2011 0 Comments

My first article on this topic concerned the sharp contraction of the residential construction industry in the U.S. I am a self-employed carpenter. The main thrust of that article was that the housing market is not going to recover to anything approaching its zenith. Bloomberg Business reported in January that housing starts fell again in December to a 529,000 annual rate. The annual rate in a good economy is considered to be a million new homes per year. The recent peak in 2005 was 2 million homes. Nationally, production for the residential construction industry has dropped about 75% off its peak. Inflation, lack of wealth, and rising energy costs preclude any great gains in housing output in the near future. The majority of the skilled construction workers will be doing something other than residential construction in the near future. What is it that we’ll be doing? First off, we are craftsman. “Craftsman” is a mind-set, a personality type. Throughout history, craftsmen have exchanged their labor, skills, and ideas for the expendable wealth of those who have it. That is the ball upon which we need to keep our eye. Many of us will likely still be craftsman in the next economy. The best-run construction companies will be able to get lean enough to live through the hard times and carve out a niche in the new residential construction industry. Most companies and individuals will not make it back. The current overextended financial situation in the U.S. will cause our world to “shrink.” Inflation and sharply rising fuel prices will force a lot of economic activity back down to the community level. Many things that we currently take for granted will become more difficult to obtain. Acquiring food, fuel, heat, and shelter will take on a greater importance in the day-to-day life of the middle class. I’m not talking about the Apocalypse. I’m just saying that things will not be as comfortable as they once were. You and your fellow middle classers will be conducting more business within your neighborhoods and communities. What do we craftsman do in the transition? First of all, keep your hand in the old construction game as long as you can. Do not create new debt for yourself. Do not bid jobs so close to the bone that you have no wiggle room. If something goes awry, and it usually does, you will have either new debt or legal problems. Speaking of new debt, get out of your old debt. The leaner you emerge from this transition period, the better your choices will be. If you have any liquid assets, consider owning some physical silver. Cash will be eaten …

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Oil Services Favorites: Schlumberger, National Oilwell Varco

Filed in Bank Gold, commodities, economy, lead, o by on February 9, 2011 0 Comments
Oil Services Favorites: Schlumberger, National Oilwell Varco

Filed under: Newsletters , Schlumberger Limited (SLB) , Commodities , Oil , Stocks to Buy “Oil had a good year in 2010, rising 15 percent, and 2011 looks to be even better, as a stronger global economy pushes demand for resources higher,” says Stephen Leeb . The editor of The Complete Investor explains, “Oil service and equipment companies are the most leveraged way to play rising oil prices. Here’s a look a Schlumberger ( SLB ) and National Oilwell Varco ( NOV ). “First is Schlumberger, operating in more than 80 countries. The company is the world’s leading supplier of energy technology, project management, and information solutions. Continue reading Oil Services Favorites: Schlumberger, National Oilwell Varco Oil Services Favorites: Schlumberger, National Oilwell Varco originally appeared on BloggingStocks on Wed, 09 Feb 2011 12:40:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Permalink | Email this | Comments

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Research In Motion (Nasdaq:RIMM) to Gain Market Share of Nokia (NYSE:NOK)

Research In Motion (Nasdaq:RIMM) is about to benefit from Nokia (NYSE:NOK) losing market share from its change in OS strategy, according to Credit Suisse (NYSE:CS). Credit Suisse analyst Kulbinder Garcha said, “Regardless of the OS that is chosen by Nokia, we expect the company will face a period of significant disruption as i) product introductions slow, ii) carrier promotions stall, and iii)

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Market Wrap-Up for Feb.3 (EL, NEM, YUM, K, CME, CVS, more)

The markets got off to a negative start today, but within the averages were several names that stood out on the upside, helping push the averages green by the market close. Screaming higher today were shares of Estee Lauder ( EL ) after the cosmetics giant beat estimates on its earnings report and raised guidance significantly. This is a name we have been watching closely and one we will consider on decent pullbacks. Also moving up on earnings-related stories were Ross Stores ( ROST ), Yum Brands ( YUM ), and Kellogg ( K ). On the flipside, earnings results hurt stocks like Ameriprise Financial ( AMP ), CME Group ( CME ), and CVS Caremark ( CVS ). Holding the averages back today a bit are energy plays that are seeing some red following multi-day gains. Newmont Mining ( NEM ) announced an acquisition this morning of Fronteer Gold ( FRG ). I will be watching the mining companies closely to see if this can get gold and sliver out of their recent slump. As I get prepared to do a national radio campaign where I will be interviewed on about 20-25 different national affiliates (I will give readers a heads up whenever I know I will be going on somewhere) regarding my “Be a Dividend Millionaire” book and of course our Dividend.com business, I want to reflect on my initial foray into the media world. About two years ago, I reached out to a local NBC affiliate to talk about what was happening in the economy and it was quite an enlightening experience. I learned some lessons early on about the media biz and business news from a local affiliate standpoint. First of all, I went in cold with no experience or training, and that likely showed my first few times on the air (fortunately no Cindy Brady-style freezing when the on-air light came on). After that, I seemed to find my groove. Unfortunately at the time, the economy was in the dumps and there was little I could do to sugarcoat the situation. Being a tell-it-like-it-is person is not something that broadcasters enjoy, depending on the station and people you deal with. In my case, my segments were focused on avoiding layoffs and when will the economy rebound. I had little in the way I was able to contribute from an investing standpoint (not my call, but the station manager at the time). I also learned about writing your own segments, which is what I had to do. The anchor would literally receive my notes for the first time as I was being seated up at the anchor desk a minute before going on the air. Can you say chaotic? I stopped doing the segments as there was a bit too much demand on what was needed for me to produce the segments, along with being held back from showcasing my investing expertise. I am excited to begin working with a top media/PR person who has worked with some key names in the financial and publishing space. I hope I am able to keep things real during my upcoming media appearances, and won’t be forced…

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The Metal People are Dying For

The Metal People are Dying For

Maybe the weak are simply being weeded from the gene pool so the strong may survive… This theory might help explain why people keep electrocuting themselves to death, cutting into live power lines to extract copper. Stories of deaths related to copper thefts have been all over the news: Last summer, a 42-year-old Appalachian man died while trying to steal copper from a live power line. Charleston Daily Mail reported “American Electric Power says copper thieves are becoming increasingly brazen, and their tactics have resulted in four deaths so far this year in the Appalachian service region.” An Illinois man hit a live wire while scrapping for copper last fall and was electrocuted. Police said this is a recent trend, with similar activity in Granite City, Venice, Brooklyn, Washington Park, and Belleville. In October, a couple from Southern California attempted to steal copper from an electrical vault. The man was electrocuted to death; the woman suffered severe burns from attempts to pull the man from the vault when it exploded. And just last month , a man attempted cutting live copper wires with a bolt cutter. He suffered from electric shock and fell 30 feet from his ladder, later dying at a Charlotte hospital. I could go on, but I think you get the point. I guess these people aren’t bright enough to know that rather than risk electrocution, it’s easier to rob someone’s house and …

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Answering Krugman on Austrian Economic Theory

Answering Krugman on Austrian Economic Theory

I still get the sense that Krugman truly doesn’t understand the Austrian position. For example, he asks, “Why is there overwhelming evidence that when central banks decide to slow the economy, the economy does indeed slow?” But because the Austrian theory says the bust occurs when the central bank backs off and allows interest rates to rise toward their “correct” level, this is hardly a problem. In fact, if central banks couldn’t slow the economy, as an Austrian economist I would be worried about my theory. Krugman also poses questions concerning (price) inflation rates and the connection between nominal and real GDP. But I think he is conflating the Austrian theory with a purely “real” business-cycle theory. Austrians understand that monetary influences can have real effects. To repeat, that is the very essence of the Mises-Hayek theory. Although most of Krugman’s objections are due to his unfamiliarity with the actual Austrian theory, I think one source of confusion came from the particular illustration I used in my article. First let’s set the context by quoting Krugman : “So what is the essence of this Austrian story? Basically, it says that what we call an economic boom is actually something like China’s disastrous Great Leap Forward, which led to a temporary surge in consumption but only at the expense of degradation of the country’s underlying productive capacity. And the unemployment that follows is a result of that degradation: there’s simply nothing useful for the unemployed workers to do. “I like this story, and there are probably other cases besides China 1958–1961 to which it applies. But what reason do we have to think that it has anything to do with the business cycles we actually see in market economies?” First, I should say I’m glad that Krugman at least concedes that (his understanding of) the Austrian explanation both is theoretically possible and actually happens in the real world — coming from the guy who referred to it in 1998 as equivalent to the “phlogiston theory of fire,” this is progress! However, Krugman still doesn’t have quite the right understanding of the Austrian view of the “capital consumption” that occurs during the unsustainable boom. As I said above, on this particular issue the fault lies with the necessarily simplistic “sushi model” I used in the article that Krugman read . In that article, in order to make sure the reader really saw why Krugman (and Tyler Cowen) were overlooking something basic, I had the villagers boost their daily sushi intake even while they developed a new technology to help augment their fishing. So during their “boom,” it would have seemed to a dull villager that both consumption and investment were rising. In my fable, this was physically possible because the villagers neglected the regular maintenance of their boats…

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