Tag: international

Weight Watchers 2011 Forecast Blows Away Expectations; Shares Rocket Higher (WTW)

Filed in dividend, earnings, Gold Bullion prices, Guidance, o, revenue, shares by on February 17, 2011 0 Comments

Weight management specialist Weight Watchers International, Inc. ( WTW ) on Thursday posted better-than-expected fourth quarter earnings and provided at 2011 forecast that wowed investing, sending its shares soaring in premarket trading. The New York-based company reported forth quarter net income of $48.9 million, or 66 cents per share, compared with just $18.7 million, or 24 cents per share, in the year-ago period. Excluding items, adjusted profit was 64 cents per share. Revenue jumped almost 15% from last year to $356.7 million. On average, Wall Street analysts expected a smaller profit of 56 cents per share, on lower revenue of $321 million. The company’s real surprise came in its guidance. For 2011, WTW said it expects full-year earnings to range from $3.50 to $3.85 per share, which would absolutely blow away analysts’ view for $2.77 per share. Weight Watchers shares surged $14.88, or +33%, in premarket trading Thursday. The Bottom Line Shares of Weight Watchers ( WTW ) have a 1.56% dividend yield, based on last night’s closing stock price of $44.92. The stock is blowing through all-time high levels of $57-$58 a share this morning. We’ll see if this level of overhead resistance plays a role in the stock as the day progresses. Weight Watchers International, Inc. ( WTW ) is not recommended at this time, holding a Dividend.com DARS™ Rating of 3.4 out of 5 stars. Be sure to visit our complete recommended list of the Best Dividend Stocks , as well as a detailed explanation of our ratings system here .

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Wednesday: 6 Iraqis Killed, 5 Wounded

Filed in Bank Gold, gld, o by on January 26, 2011 0 Comments

At least six Iraqis were killed and five more were wounded in light attacks that focused on ministry officials in Baghdad. Meanwhile, former British Prime Minister Tony Blair’s sister-in-law called on the International Court of Justice in The Hague to …

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How Not to Stop a Terrorist

Filed in AMAG, BP, deflation, euro, lead, Lear, New Gold, o, silver, target by on January 26, 2011 0 Comments

As Glenn Greenwald predicted, terrorists have attacked the next most logical target. A suicide bomber has caused the death of nearly three dozen people in Moscow’s Domodedovo Airport by attacking a crowded area not subject to rigorous security measures. Mr. Greenwald expected the next terrorist bombing to take place in the crowded lines just before the security checkpoint. Instead, they went for a soft target just outside of the hard target, but it wasn’t quite the soft target Mr. Greenwald expected… The suicide bomber went to the back door instead of the front. The other unguarded end of the airport was attacked: the part just beyond the security line where passengers crowd together to pick up their bags and find ground transportation or meet relatives and friends. “Medvedev Orders Bomb Probe, Threatens Sackings,” reads an Associated Press headline this morning. The article continues… “Medvedev lashed out at law enforcement and airport authorities over the attack at Domodedovo, an international hub and major gateway to Russia, which killed at least eight foreigners… “‘It is clear that there is a systemic failure to provide security for people’ at Domodedovo, said Medvedev. “He ordered the Interior Ministry to recommend transport security officials for dismissal and said authorities found culpable would be held responsible, suggesting they could face prosecution.” Exactly what were security officials supposed to do?: “Domodedovo Airport said it was not responsible for the blast. ‘We fully met all the requirements in the sphere of air transport security for which we are responsible,’ spokeswoman Yelena Galanova said in televised comments.” Domodedovo Airport is like just about every other airport in the world. That is to say, there is no protocol to stop random people from wandering into the baggage claim area. Now I suppose there may be. But I’m not sure it will help. You can “harden” one target all you want; there will still be an unprotect zone just beyond your securest point. Medvedev doesn’t want to accept that… “He urged officials to develop a system that would provide for ‘total checks’ on people and bags at airports.” I’m not sure what this is supposed to mean. Wherever these “total checks” start, there will be people congregating somewhere prior to being totally checked. These people will…

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In Praise of Anarchy

Filed in AMAG, BP, deflation, Lear, o, Spot Gold, ubs, US Dollar by on January 24, 2011 0 Comments

Left alone, good people tend to do good things. And, when unobstructed by coercion, force, violence or any other tool employed by the state in order to foster and maintain a more “responsible,” “socially conscious” citizenship, most people tend toward being good people…all on their very own. Nowhere was this sentiment better expressed during the past few weeks than in the flood-stricken state of Queensland, Australia (and, more lately, in the state of Victoria, to Queensland’s south). The rains that inundated an area the size of France and Germany (combined!) across the Sunshine State wrought havoc and destruction upon its people. Lives were lost, property damaged and industry crippled. When the worst of Mother Nature’s wrath had subsided, Queensland residents were left with a monumental clean up. To their credit, these individuals, in the face of near-immeasurable disaster, performed admirably. They did what came naturally. Contrary to the patriotic rally cries of politicians, they didn’t do what Queenslanders do; they did what good people do. And it was beautiful. The general feeling was perhaps best summed up by Wally “The King” Lewis, a retired national football hero, who spent the last week of his holidays helping his fellow Brisbane residents prepare sandbags and to bail rising flood waters out of their homes. (It is worth pointing out here that, for many Australians, there is no higher office to be attained in the land than that of venerated sporting legend.) Speaking to National Nine News from the waterlogged front yard of a neighbor – whom he had never met – Wally said, “If someone’s doing it tough, I think it’s the right thing to do to put the hand up and ask them if they want any help.” The interviewer then turned his microphone to another volunteer. “What was your reaction when Wally Lewis turned up?” Typifying the laid back disposition of the crowd, the young man casually replied, “[Laughs] Yeah, I was a little surprised but…you know…people help out. It’s all good.” The Australian people appeared to be perilously close to discovering something very important about themselves; something, perhaps, they’ve always known; an instinctual tendency toward human solidarity, the natural urge to help a neighbor in distress, to lend a hand; in short, to volunteer. Alas, barely had the first piece of debris been cleared away when the media, as it typically does, lost sight of the bigger picture. Alongside inspirational stories of non-violent, voluntary cooperation, the local papers turned their attention to the state’s role in the cleanup. Should the state and federal governments remain focused on returning “their” budgets to surplus, or should they deploy funds to assist those in need of help? In other words, how “best” should the state spend its citizens’ money…as if the only just, honest option had not already expired on point of expropriation in the first place? [The answer, in other words, is not to steal it.] While sifting through the news …

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Baker Hughes Upgraded to “Buy” at Goldman Sachs (BHI)

Oilfield services provider Baker Hughes Incorporated ( BHI ) on Friday caught a big upgrade from analysts at Goldman Sachs. The firm said it upgraded BHI from “Neutral” to “Buy” with a $70 price target, which implies a $25% upside to the stock’s Thursday closing price of $54.83. A Goldman analyst commented, “BHI has the lowest international margins relative to peers but we expect this gap to narrow. While the stock has done well recently, it is one of the worst performers from the 2008 highs, and higher international margins should drive EPS revisions. 4Q earnings is the next catalyst; we are 10% above consensus (11%/4% above in 2011/2012).” Baker Hughes shares rose 99 cents, or +1.8%, in premarket trading Friday. The Bottom Line Shares of Baker Hughes ( BHI ) have a 1.09% dividend yield, based on last night’s closing stock price of $54.83. The stock has technical support in the $50-$52 price area. If the shares can firm up, we see overhead resistance around the $57-$62 price levels. Baker Hughes Incorporated ( BHI ) is not recommended at this time, holding a Dividend.com DARS™ Rating of 3.4 out of 5 stars. Be sure to visit our complete recommended list of the Best Dividend Stocks , as well as a detailed explanation of our ratings system here .

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Weight Watchers Upgraded to “Buy” at Bank of America/Merrill Lynch (WTW)

Filed in bank of america, dividend, Gold Investing, o, shares, target, upgrade by on December 7, 2010 0 Comments

Weight management specialist Weight Watchers International, Inc. ( WTW ) on Tuesday saw its rating and price target boosted by analysts at Bank of America/Merrill Lynch. The firm said it upgraded WTW to “Buy” all the way up from “Underperform,” citing the company’s revitalized business plan, higher margins, and low valuation. The analyst also raised its price target from $34, to $38, which implies a 7% upside to the stock’s Monday closing price of $35.52. Weight Watchers shares rose 85 cents, or +2.4%, in premarket trading Tuesday. The Bottom Line Shares of Weight Watchers ( WTW ) have a 1.97% dividend yield, based on last night’s closing stock price of $35.52. The stock has technical support in the $30-$32 price area. If the shares can firm up, we see overhead resistance around the $40 price level. Weight Watchers International, Inc. ( WTW ) is not recommended at this time, holding a Dividend.com DARS™ Rating of 3.4 out of 5 stars. Be sure to visit our complete recommended list of the Best Dividend Stocks , as well as a detailed explanation of our ratings system here .

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Philip Morris International’s Target, Estimates Boosted at Goldman Sachs (PM)

Cigarette superpower Philip Morris International Inc. ( PM ) on Tuesday saw its price target and earnings estimates raised on Tuesday by analysts at Goldman Sachs. The firm said it raised its estimates for PM through 2012, citing plans to raise its prices. Goldman maintained its “Buy” rating on PM and introduced a new $70 price target, which implies a nearly 20% upside to the stock’s Monday closing price of $58.53. Philip Morris shares rose 37 cents, or +0.6%, in premarket trading Tuesday. The Bottom Line We have been recommending shares of Phillip Morris International ( PM ) since Mar.12,2009, when the stock was trading at $33.65. The company has a 4.37% dividend yield, based on last night’s closing stock price of $58.53. Philip Morris International Inc. ( PM ) is a “Highly Recommended” dividend stock, holding a Dividend.com DARS™ Rating of 3.9 out of 5 stars. Be sure to visit our complete recommended list of the Best Dividend Stocks , as well as a detailed explanation of our ratings system here .

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The FBI’s Stalinist Homeland Security Theater

Filed in Ashland, BP, deflation, EPS, Gold, o, sov, Spot Gold, target, ubs by on December 3, 2010 0 Comments
The FBI’s Stalinist Homeland Security Theater

The FBI’s Stalinist Homeland Security Theater “The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which.” — George Orwell, Animal Farm A few days after bombs ripped apart two apartment buildings Moscow , residents of Ryazan — a town 100 miles southeast of the Capital City — were alarmed to find several suspicious-looking figures loitering near a 13-story apartment complex. After police arrived on the scene they extracted three large sugar sacks from the high-rise. An examination of the sacks found that they contained hexagen — the same high-yield explosive that had been used in the Moscow terrorist bombings just a few days earlier. The police arrested two of the mysterious strangers, who immediately produced credentials issued by the Russian Federal Security Service (FSB), the successor to the KGB. Within a few hours high-ranking FSB officials intervened to free their operatives, claiming that they had been involved in an innocuous “training exercise.” “This was not a bomb,” insisted then-FSB Director Nikolai Patrushev. “The exercise may not have been carried out well, but it was only a test, and the so-called explosive was only sacks of sugar.” There was at least one lapse in efficiency on the part of the FSB: The agency neglected to retrieve the detonator, which remained in the custody of the local police. Leaving aside the fact that tests had confirmed the presence of hexagen inside the “dummy” bomb, Patrushev didn’t explain why the FSB would attach a genuine detonator to phony explosives. Nor did he explain why the Security Organs insisted on collecting the “sugar sacks” and keeping them under armed guard at a nearby military base. Patrushev’s account didn’t satisfy one of the paratroopers given that peculiar assignment. The soldier smuggled a small sample collected from one of the sacks to a laboratory, and the resulting analysis confirmed that the substance was hexagen, not sucrose. The Ryazan “training exercise” took place on September 22, 1999. During the previous two weeks, hundreds of people had died in the Moscow apartment bombings. The FSB, acting with what could charitably be called indecent haste, destroyed both of those crime scenes before critical evidence could be collected. Shortly thereafter, six Chechen separatists (five of them in absentia) were accused of plotting the terrorist rampage. Invoking the need to avenge the innocent dead, Moscow carried out a punitive invasion of Chechnya, a predominantly Muslim province whose population has long sought independence from Russia. This series of events struck many in Russia as bit too tidy. In a house editorial published the day before the “training exercise” in Ryazan, the Moscow Times observed that “the bombed-out shell of the apartment block on Ulitsa Guryanova was destroyed in a controlled implosion, reducing to rubble the remains of the building and irreparably buying beneath it any remaining traces of evidence  — just ten days after the explosion. Workers at Kashirskoye Shosse, meanwhile, began clearing the rubble from the site as early as September 13 — the day of the bombing.” As the Times pointed out, the FSB’s insistence that the case had been “solved” was impossible to reconcile with the fact that “untold traces of chemical residue, fingerprints, technical fragments, [and] hair and DNA samples that were present at the [bombing] sites are now irrevocably lost.” “Is this ignorance?” asked the Times . “In the capital city of a country where the…

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Cameron International (CAM): Rising Demand for Subsea Safety Systems

Filed in Bank Gold, commodities, gulf of mexico, o, ubs by on November 30, 2010 0 Comments
Cameron International (CAM): Rising Demand for Subsea Safety Systems

Filed under: International Markets , Newsletters , Commodities , Oil , Stocks to Buy “The disaster in the Gulf of Mexico is likely to have positive ramifications for Cameron International ( CAM ),” says energy sector specialist Elliott Gue . The editor of The Energy Strategist explains, “The political fallout could usher in stringent regulations governing blowout preventers (BOP), subsea equipment and redundant safety systems on rigs. “Such an outcome would be consistent with past experience in the energy industry. After the Exxon Valdez spill, the government pushed oil companies to use double-hull tankers and phase out single hulls. Continue reading Cameron International (CAM): Rising Demand for Subsea Safety Systems Cameron International (CAM): Rising Demand for Subsea Safety Systems originally appeared on BloggingStocks on Tue, 30 Nov 2010 13:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Permalink | Email this | Comments

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The Forest, the Trees and the TSA

Filed in BP, deflation, o, silver by on November 29, 2010 0 Comments

With all the naked viewing and groping going on, I wonder if this is the United States of America or the back room of an adult video store. We have two major problems here, the TSA and its intrusive unconstitutional invasions of our rights, and the bigger question of why are we turning into a police state. Let’s start with the TSA. How many passengers have I seen interviewed on TV who all share the notion that “If it makes us safer then I think it is a good idea. I just want to get to my destination in one piece.” Not only does this presume that the government is more capable at assuring safety than private citizens, but it also illustrates an alarming trend in this country where we have become willing to so easily trade freedom for the illusion of safety (or prosperity, or charity). Let me ask you this — who has the greatest interest in safe and secure airplanes? The government? On the contrary, the people themselves have the greatest self interest in safety. The airlines would not want to jeopardize their reputation, their financial security, nor the lives of the passengers. Then there would be the insurance companies who insure those planes who would insist on the airlines taking proper steps for safe travel. And finally there are the passengers, who are so interested in safety that they willingly bend over and accept the government’s intrusion. So we now have three key private players with major interest in the safety of planes. The TSA only had a two-year contract before the airlines could opt out. I believe it is time for America’s airlines to opt out, or for the people to opt out of America’s airlines. Let airlines decide what security policies they employ, and then let the free people of America choose which airlines they feel safest flying. This simply means if you don’t want to blow up prematurely (if blowing up was already on your agenda), ride on a plane with tight professional security, and if you don’t want to pay more for a ticket (or be probed) ride on the plane without it. Freedom and security is not a trade off. Freedom IS security. If you believe that the federal government has the greatest interest in a secure plane, or that we should employ a more intrusive “papers please” approach or the Israeli model of rapid fire interrogations, let me ask you a few questions. If we could make airlines 100% safe, so safe that we know that a terrorist will never board a plane and take it over, would that be the end of terrorism as we know it? Do secure airlines mean a secure America? Hardly, considering that in America we have thousands of events held daily where greater numbers of people gather. Which brings us to the title of this article, “The Forest, the Trees and the TSA.” The TSA is actually only a symptom, while the real problem is our foreign policy. Our history in the Middle East did not start on Sept. 11, 2001. Understanding our involvement around the world and how it has a habit of coming to roost is key before we end up with check points outside our children’s soccer games. Though any step toward privatization in the airline industry is an improvement, the ultimate solution to our problems is bringing our troops home and minding our own business. Foreign belligerence is immoral, incredibly costly, and it threatens our security by inspiring people to hate us. This is not a “blame America …

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How High Will Gold Go in 2011?

The next major scene in gold’s bull market act is about to take stage… with prices expected to skyrocket. Rapidly increasing demand and stagnant mine production levels are quickly leading to a deficit in supplies, forcing gold prices higher. Meanwhile, gold’s upward momentum will become greater as more and more investors and institutional funds wake up to the fact that they need to get out of the U.S. dollar. ~~SIGNUP_WD~~ Next year, I believe we could see gold prices in the $1,500-$2,000 range as the dollar continues to wane in value. Just this week, Russia and China decided to reject the U.S. dollar and use their own domestic currencies for bilateral trade — a move that’s part of a developing economic relationship between the two countries. Back in September, for instance, Russia and China inked a $6 billion deal for coal and coal-to-liquids projects over the next 25 years. Once other countries decide that they need to follow suit, the entire house of cards could come tumbling down. In the short term, the powers that be will try to prop up the system while they get their own personal affairs in order. But it is inevitable that they will lose control. And gold prices will be forced to scream higher. Gold to scream higher in 2011 The main driver of rising gold prices will not be the short-term speculative demand that comes from mining shares or commodity futures, but from longer-term buying interests seeking risk protection for their savings due to depreciating worldwide currencies. Gold is moving up against all currencies worldwide. And while some may flee the U.S. dollar to go into the euro or some other fiat currency for a time, most will eventually come to gold as the only true safe haven for their savings. These buyers are strong hands with long-term interests who will be seeking to protect wealth. This trend is already underway, but will accelerate greatly in 2011. You have to remember that there have only been about 150,000 tonnes of gold ever mined out of the ground. (If you melted it into a giant cube, it would only measure 20x20x20 yards.) That means it only takes a small percentage of investors to move into the gold market to move prices much higher. Changing of the guard The unsustainable U.S. debt structure looks like it’s getting ready to implode. This instability translates into a worldwide diversification away from the dollar. A changing of the guard appears to be underway— meaning the days of the dollar as the international reserve currency appear to be numbered. Keep this in mind as you make your investment decisions for 2011… Gold should do very well this year— and for many years to come. One way I’m hedging my portfolio is with a new, one-of-a-kind investment vehicle designed to double the return of gold prices. Mind you, this investment has been all but ignored by media since its launch… After all, gold has never been understood or appreciated by the mainstream, despite its historic economic significance. Still, for every 1% increase in the price of gold, this new gold investment vehicle delivers a positive 2% return. My colleague Luke Burgess just finished filming a presentation explaining the details of this investment. You can check out this short video here. Good Investing, Greg McCoach Analyst, Wealth Daily Investment Director, Insider Alert and Mining Speculator How High

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Kiss My Vindication

Filed in ceo, Gold, GOld juniors, o, shares by on November 10, 2010 0 Comments
Kiss My Vindication

Seven years ago, I was sitting in the Fort Worth Club drinking bourbon with several oil execs, investors, and the up-and-coming CEO of a tiny oil company who had a rather novel idea. We had just returned from visiting a legendary oil boomtown called Desdemona. On the way back from Desdemona, we took an impromptu tour of the Barnett Shale, a yet unproven source of natural gas. Oil was trading for $35 a barrel at the time, natural gas for $2 per mcf. Desdemona has a romantic history in Texas oil lore. In September 1918, Tom Dees, director of the Hog Creek Oil Company, struck oil on land owned by Joe Duke… and Desdemona quickly joined the list of Western boomtowns. As many as sixteen thousand flocked to Desdemona between 1919 and 1922. At this time, the Desdemona field was perhaps the second largest in the United States, and stockholders of the Hog Creek Oil Company could sell their $100 shares for $10,250 each. At its peak in 1919, Desdemona was pumping out 20,000 barrels of oil per day. The easy money attracted prospectors as well as prostitutes. Crime flourished. It was all good. But these were the early days of the oil industry. And technology for maintaining reservoir pressure and field integrity didn’t exist. As a result, by 1922, production had dropped to 6,000 barrels a day. The boom turned into a bust. By the time I visited Desdemona, oil coming out of the ground was a mere trickle. However, there was still a significant amount of oil left in the reservoir — maybe has much as a billion barrels. This brings me to the CEO’s novel idea… You see, as we sat in the Fort Worth Club, the CEO and the other oil executives began talking, throwing out names and phrases that were completely foreign to me: M. King Hubbert Matthew Simmons Hubbert’s Peak Peak Oil Catastrophic decline rates Enhanced oil extraction $125 a barrel oil The end of cheap oil The need to find two Saudi Arabias by 2015 to meet demand I’ll be honest. Your editor felt about as out of place as a vegan at a bull roast… I simply didn’t understand what they were saying. But it definitely piqued my curiosity. I went back to Baltimore and read everything I could get my hands on about M. King Hubbert. I talked to Matt Simmons for hours, and picked his brain about Peak Oil and Saudi Arabia. I studied oil field dynamics… secondary and tertiary oil extraction… horizontal drilling… fracturing… decline rates of the top 25 producing oil fields… And when I was done, I realized the world was facing a crisis of epic proportions. I also knew that if I was right, this would be the investment opportunity of the century. The world was running out of cheap oil. And the CEO at Fort Worth Club told me that we have no other choice but to go after every single drop of oil left behind in aging oil fields, like Desdemona. If you’ve been reading Wealth Daily since its beginning seven years ago, you know one of our major investment theses has been Peak Oil. (You can read more of what we were saying back then here , here , and here .) In 2004, we made a bold call: Oil was going to hit $150 a barrel in five years. Well, we were wrong. It happened in four years. Along the way, we took a lot of heat from the establishment for being alarmists, “peak freaks,” doom-…

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