Tag: people

How to Buy Yukon Gold Stocks

Filed in BP, Ford, Gold, Gold Exploration, Gold Market, gold-stocks, Lear, New Gold, o, target by on February 18, 2011 0 Comments

For the past few weeks, I’ve been urging investors to take a close look at a quality gold exploration companies working in Canada’s Yukon Territory… But with so many Yukon gold stocks to choose from, it can be difficult for investors to determine which companies deserve the most attention. And that’s exactly why I put this article together for you today. For the first time ever, I’ll be publishing some of the guidelines I’ve been personally using to buy Yukon gold stocks. The very first thing investors should know is that the Yukon gold story is just getting started. Last year, nearly 80,000 new gold claims were staked in the Yukon. But this represents only 4% of the Yukon’s total land mass. There is still plenty of staking potential. In 2011, however, it’s very likely we’ll see several companies make big gold discoveries. In an average year, only about $20 or $30 million is spent exploring for gold in the Yukon. Now that the price of gold is breaking record highs, about $100 million is spent in an average year. But in 2011, the Yukon Geological Survey estimates almost $330 million will be spent for work programs and drilling this summer in the Yukon. With so much exploration going on, someone will no doubt find gold. Almost 20 million ounces of placer gold have been taken out of the Yukon Territory over the century. The Yukon overall has the biggest placer gold signatures in the world— meaning there are very large sources of gold in the Yukon from whence this gold sprang. Geologists generally agree that the source of the placer deposits is typically 10 times larger than the amount of placer gold discovered in an area. In the case of …

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Market Wrap-Up for Feb.4 (AET, WY, MA, K, SPG, AVB, more)

Talk about a confusing jobs number this morning! The estimates were for 150K new jobs, but instead the number came in at 36K. Yet the unemployment rate fell from 9.5% to 9%. Now I consider myself to be pretty good at math, but what formula was used to come up with these results? The market certainly didn’t have any trouble with the number as an afternoon rally pushed up to finish higher on the day. Aetna ( AET ) and Weyerhaeuser ( WY ) received some love from buyers following earnings results. Aetna also raised their dividend payout from $.05 to $.60 on an annualized basis. That’s certainly a bit more of respectable payout from this health insurance giant. Mastercard ( MA ) and Kellogg ( K ) continued to see upside from yesterday’s earnings results as well. On the downside today were REITs following results that failed to excite investors. Simon Property Group ( SPG ) and AvalonBay Communities ( AVB ) paced the way lower. Be sure to check out the list of 10 dividend stocks we removed from our recommended list if you did not read the e-mail alert that we sent out earlier. As I mentioned yesterday, I am just starting my preparation for national radio interviews for my upcoming Be a Dividend Millionaire book as well as discussions on dividend investing, and of course Dividend.com. Yesterday afternoon, I had my initial interview with my media team. The process is to identify key areas of discussion for my future interviews as well as pointers to make the interviews as captivating as possible. I’m not sure how long the interviews will be, so you need to have game plans to hit all your key points in whatever time is allotted. One of the people I was working with yesterday afternoon is a baby boomer who is worried about not having enough income built up for her retirement. What I did was point her to our Compounding Interest Calculator , and by the end of the call, she said I’d inspired her and given her hope! Think about this example: you are just about to turn 50 years old and have not yet saved a dime (it’s quite common – check out the data below that was just released by the Harris Poll just yesterday). Believe it or not, even at 50, you still…

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Market Wrap-Up for Feb.2 (BRCM, TWX, MAT, HSY, CHRW, WHR, more)

The market is coming off a big first day of the month, which continues a recent pattern of big jumps at the start of each new month. We are still looking at quite a few candidates as possible additions to our Best Dividend Stocks List , and there were a couple of names that are a bit more aggressive (low yield, more stock price growth) which reported numbers last night. Lubrizol ( LZ ) and Jones Lang-LaSalle ( JLL ) saw investors embrace their results early on, but did close off intraday highs. Elsewhere, Time Warner ( TWX ) reported good earnings and raised its dividend, to boot. Dividend increases were a big theme today, with Mattel ( MAT ), Broadcom ( BRCM ), and Hershey ( HSY ) also joining the dividend increase parade. On the downside, we were seeing sellers pushing the eject button on C.H. Robinson Worldwide ( CHRW ) and Whirlpool ( WHR ) following those earning results. Lastly, a negative note on FedEx ( FDX ) from a Wall Street analyst pulled those shares lower. In some parts of the market (namely the Tech/Online space), we are seeing company valuations getting a bit out of hand. The resulting fallout from earnings results can be quite painful when companies with super-high valuations report — even if they meet analyst expectations. If you are…

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NEWSFLASH: The Meltdown Didn’t Have to Happen

Filed in Alan Greenspan, BP, democrats, Federal Reserve, Gold, Gold Market, lead, Lear, o, Yahoo by on January 28, 2011 0 Comments
NEWSFLASH: The Meltdown Didn’t Have to Happen

Watching the government do practically anything is often akin to watching molasses run down the hill in January. But like that slow running ooze, even the government eventually manages to accomplish its feat. The problem in this case is that they are telling us what we already know. So here’s the newsflash sportfans: the financial meltdown could have been stopped. Gee thanks… From the New York Times by Sewell Chan entitled: Financial Meltdow was ‘Avoidable’, Inquiry Concludes “ The 2008 financial crisis was an “avoidable” disaster caused by widespread failures in government regulation, corporate mismanagement and heedless risk-taking by Wall Street, according to the conclusions of a Congressional inquiry. The government commission that investigated the financial crisis casts a wide net of blame, faulting two administrations, the Federal Reserve and other regulators for permitting a calamitous concoction: shoddy mortgage lending, the excessive packaging and sale of loans to investors, and risky bets on securities backed by the loans. “ The greatest tragedy would be to accept the refrain that no one could have seen this coming and thus nothing could have been done,” the panel wrote in the report’s conclusions. “If we accept this notion, it will happen again.” The commission’s report finds fault with two Fed chairmen: Alan Greenspan, a skeptic of regulation who led the central bank as the housing bubble expanded, and his successor, Ben S. Bernanke, who did not foresee the crisis but then played a crucial role in the response to it. It criticizes Mr. Greenspan for advocating financial deregulation and cites a “pivotal failure to stem the flow of toxic mortgages” under his leadership as “the prime example” of government negligence. It also criticizes the Bush administration’s “inconsistent response” to the crisis — allowing Lehman Brothers to go bankrupt in September 2008 after earlier bailing out another bank, Bear Stearns, with help from the…

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Afghanistan, Iraq, Collateral Damage and the Banality of Killing

Filed in AMAG, BP, deflation, New Gold, o, sov by on January 14, 2011 0 Comments

The standard explanations for the Arizona killings are now being set forth, such as widespread violence in America and right-wing extremism. I’d like to weigh in with another possible factor, one that I can’t prove but one that I think Americans ought to at least consider: the fact that killing has now become an accepted, essential, normal, and permanent part of American life. No, I’m not referring to the widespread gun violence in America that liberals point to as part of their gun-control agenda. I’m not even referring to the widespread violence that accompanies the decades-long drug war, especially in Mexico. I’m instead referring to the U.S. government’s regular killing of people thousands of miles away in Afghanistan and Iraq, killing that has now gone on regularly for some 10 years and that has become a fairly hum-drum part of our daily lives. Six people were killed and 14 were injured in the Arizona shootings, including a woman who was shot through the head and a 9-year-old girl whose life was snuffed out. Everyone is shocked over the horror, which is detailed on the front page of every newspaper across the country. But let’s face it: Such killings go on every week in Afghanistan and Iraq and have for some 10 years. Parents, children, brothers, sisters, cousins, grandparents, friends, brides, grooms, and wedding parties. People are killed in those two countries …

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Skype to Acquire Qik with Mobile Streaming Video

Filed in Apple, lead, New Gold, o, public-offering, South African Gold, Spot Gold by on January 7, 2011 0 Comments
Skype to Acquire Qik with Mobile Streaming Video

Filed under: Deals , Competitive Strategy , Apple Inc (AAPL) , Sony Corp ADR (SNE) , Smartphones , Initial Public Offerings The market for streaming video calling is exploding. An estimated 13.2 million people worldwide will make video calls this year, up 400% from last year. By 2015, it is estimated that 155.1 million calls will use streaming videos. Skype is a leader in low-cost phone calls. Calls to other people who have Skype are usually free. Now Skype is offering video calling for as low as $8.99 per month, with up to 10 people on the same call. Skype accounts for 25% of international calling traffic, up from 13% in 2009. Continue reading Skype to Acquire Qik with Mobile Streaming Video Skype to Acquire Qik with Mobile Streaming Video originally appeared on BloggingStocks on Fri, 07 Jan 2011 13:30:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Permalink | Email this | Comments

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Alex Jones: Eco-Fascists Call For Prison Cities

Filed in Bank Gold, Gold Spot Market, o by on January 7, 2011 0 Comments

Infowars.com | People who resist the state controlling every aspect of their existence will be forced to live in squalid ghettos.

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Forget Buying in the Suburbs and Go Rent in the City

Filed in BP, Debt, deflation, inflation, lead, o, silver, Spot Gold, target by on January 5, 2011 0 Comments

It’s getting more expensive to live in Baltimore….at least if you’re a renter. According to a recent article in the Baltimore Sun rents are up more than 6% over what they were last year in the Baltimore metro area. If you count the drop in various concessions — like waived application fees or initial free rent — then the increase is even more. There is a drag on the rental market, however: the regretful buyers who now need to rent out the homes they can’t sell. Lois Foster, a Baltimore real estate agent who helps people find homes to rent and manages properties for owners-turned-landlords, said she’s seeing rents of $200 to $500 less a month than owners could have gotten two or three years ago. There’s just a lot of competition, she said. The gild is off the buying lily. All the credit that oozed out of the banks found its way into the national psyche. There it gave off a funny smelling gas that puffed up hopes and dizzied senses. Stock prices were the first beneficiaries. Fattening 401(k)s danced 1920’s-style energetic jigs with dreams of early retirement. Even as those 401(k)s and those hopes tired and finally dropped dead on the dance floor, the Fed held down interest rates and more funny air kept the nation high. People pinned new hopes on — and sent reams of borrowed new money into — real estate. That’s come to the sort of end you’d expect. While government cheerleading and easy credit drew in increasing numbers of bigger fools, the rental market found itself a lot emptier. All the people who really couldn’t afford to buy and who should have been renting were too busy buying on greater margins and not renting. Some hotspot cities like New York and Boston saw their rental markets surging along with their real estate markets…but third-stringers like Baltimore… “Cohan, with Southern Management, said some competitors were offering as much as three to four months of free rent to get people in the door in 2008 and 2009. Not anymore.” It’s no wonder that they were having such a …

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Big Brother: America’s Police State Mentality in the Electronic Age

Filed in Gold, o by on January 1, 2011 0 Comments

Pushed to the extreme and without clear democratic oversight, it becomes the mark of a totalitarian state, when authorities feel that they never have enough information on the people. It is because information is power and state bureaucrats and politicians naturally like to be in control; on the one hand, releasing as little information about their own actions through an imposed secrecy, and on the other, accumulating as much information as possible about the citizens. And today, modern governments have all the tools to transform their country into a creeping police state, more so now then ever before, in this electronic age. They have access to information technology that previous full-fledged “police state” governments could only have dreamed about.

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Happy Holidays from Dividend.com

Filed in dividend, Gold Investment, o by on December 25, 2010 0 Comments

We love what we do here, and we hope that it shows in our work. However, we welcome the (very) short break the Holiday Season offers us, because, if only for a day, we can forget about the markets for a little while and instead eat, drink, and be merry, surrounded by the people that mean everything to us. So, from the bottom of our hearts, we wish everyone out there a very Merry Christmas, a Happy Hanukkah, Happy Kwanzaa, and a very Happy and Prosperous New Year! Be sure to visit our complete recommended list of the Best Dividend Stocks , as well as a detailed explanation of our ratings system here .

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H5N1: Heads You Live, Tails You Don’t

Filed in BP, GOld juniors, Gold Market, o, target by on December 15, 2010 0 Comments

Death and taxes are as certain as the sunrise. To that short list, I would also add the flu. With the twinkling, colored lights found up and down the avenues these days, the flu arrives marked by fever, coughing, aches, and a runny nose. The flu is something everyone would just as soon avoid, but that’s easier said than done. In the U.S. alone, an estimated 25–50 million cases of the flu are reported each year, while worldwide the estimates range as high as 1 billion. Fortunately, most cases of the flu are relatively harmless; the typical case lasts four or five days. For most, it is an inconvenient and uncomfortable hindrance. But that’s not to say influenza cannot be serious. For some, it’s as life threatening as a heart attack. More than 200,000 people in the United States are hospitalized due to the flu, while deaths from flu-related causes claim an average of 23,600 lives each year. Across the globe, 300,000-500,000 people suffer the same tragic end. The bigger nightmare is, was, and will always be the prospect of a worldwide flu pandemic. The Granddaddy of them all Like the H1N1 from a year ago, these decidedly more deadly strains are caused by newly-formed virus types that our immune systems are ill-equipped to handle. The worst of these occurred in 1918, when 20%-40% of the population became ill with the infamous Spanish Flu. This outbreak resulted in over 50 million deaths worldwide, becoming “the biggie” that all strains will forever be measured against. Today, numbers like those are simply unfathomable. But don’t believe for a second that because this calamity happened in days gone by that something of that magnitude couldn’t happen again. There is a reason the governments of the world go into a near-panic state anytime a true pandemic threatens. Our ability to effectively respond to such a crisis is outdated and hopelessly inefficient. Just take our response to the H1N1 virus last year… From initial detection of the killer virus, it took a full eight months for the FDA to approve a vaccine. Meanwhile, the distribution chain was so fraught with problems that after 13 months, only 23% of the American people had received a vaccination. To put it bluntly, that kind of performance would have been a failure of the highest order had it occurred in 1918… The Spanish Flu was actually at its worst in the first four to six months, killing up to 25 million worldwide. Had H1N1 been more deadly, we would have had a catastrophe on our hands instead of a historical footnote. The next time, we may not be so lucky — especially if a mutated version of H5N1 shows up. It’s nature’s answer to the worst-case scenario. H5N1: Heads you live, tails you don’t Flu researcher Yi Guan considers this very prospect a “super nightmare for the entire world.” “If that happens,” Yi says, “I will retire immediately and lock myself in the P3 lab. H5N1 kills half the people it infects. Even if you inject yourself with a vaccine, it may be too late. Maybe in just a couple hours it takes your life.” Yet the H5N1 virus continues to lurk out there… As of October 18, the World Health Organization had reported…

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The Forest, the Trees and the TSA

Filed in BP, deflation, o, silver by on November 29, 2010 0 Comments

With all the naked viewing and groping going on, I wonder if this is the United States of America or the back room of an adult video store. We have two major problems here, the TSA and its intrusive unconstitutional invasions of our rights, and the bigger question of why are we turning into a police state. Let’s start with the TSA. How many passengers have I seen interviewed on TV who all share the notion that “If it makes us safer then I think it is a good idea. I just want to get to my destination in one piece.” Not only does this presume that the government is more capable at assuring safety than private citizens, but it also illustrates an alarming trend in this country where we have become willing to so easily trade freedom for the illusion of safety (or prosperity, or charity). Let me ask you this — who has the greatest interest in safe and secure airplanes? The government? On the contrary, the people themselves have the greatest self interest in safety. The airlines would not want to jeopardize their reputation, their financial security, nor the lives of the passengers. Then there would be the insurance companies who insure those planes who would insist on the airlines taking proper steps for safe travel. And finally there are the passengers, who are so interested in safety that they willingly bend over and accept the government’s intrusion. So we now have three key private players with major interest in the safety of planes. The TSA only had a two-year contract before the airlines could opt out. I believe it is time for America’s airlines to opt out, or for the people to opt out of America’s airlines. Let airlines decide what security policies they employ, and then let the free people of America choose which airlines they feel safest flying. This simply means if you don’t want to blow up prematurely (if blowing up was already on your agenda), ride on a plane with tight professional security, and if you don’t want to pay more for a ticket (or be probed) ride on the plane without it. Freedom and security is not a trade off. Freedom IS security. If you believe that the federal government has the greatest interest in a secure plane, or that we should employ a more intrusive “papers please” approach or the Israeli model of rapid fire interrogations, let me ask you a few questions. If we could make airlines 100% safe, so safe that we know that a terrorist will never board a plane and take it over, would that be the end of terrorism as we know it? Do secure airlines mean a secure America? Hardly, considering that in America we have thousands of events held daily where greater numbers of people gather. Which brings us to the title of this article, “The Forest, the Trees and the TSA.” The TSA is actually only a symptom, while the real problem is our foreign policy. Our history in the Middle East did not start on Sept. 11, 2001. Understanding our involvement around the world and how it has a habit of coming to roost is key before we end up with check points outside our children’s soccer games. Though any step toward privatization in the airline industry is an improvement, the ultimate solution to our problems is bringing our troops home and minding our own business. Foreign belligerence is immoral, incredibly costly, and it threatens our security by inspiring people to hate us. This is not a “blame America …

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