Tag: price

Gold, Silver Prices Today Rise to 30-Year High on Unrest in Middle East

Ongoing unrest in the middle east is causing investors to push up the price of gold and silver today, with silver reaching a 30-year high, and palladium also rising to its highest levels in 10 years.Physical demand for gold in the middle east has been skyrocketing, increasing 39 percent in the fourth quarter, according to World Gold Council, as locals in the region see the potential for

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How to Buy Yukon Gold Stocks

Filed in BP, Ford, Gold, Gold Exploration, Gold Market, gold-stocks, Lear, New Gold, o, target by on February 18, 2011 0 Comments

For the past few weeks, I’ve been urging investors to take a close look at a quality gold exploration companies working in Canada’s Yukon Territory… But with so many Yukon gold stocks to choose from, it can be difficult for investors to determine which companies deserve the most attention. And that’s exactly why I put this article together for you today. For the first time ever, I’ll be publishing some of the guidelines I’ve been personally using to buy Yukon gold stocks. The very first thing investors should know is that the Yukon gold story is just getting started. Last year, nearly 80,000 new gold claims were staked in the Yukon. But this represents only 4% of the Yukon’s total land mass. There is still plenty of staking potential. In 2011, however, it’s very likely we’ll see several companies make big gold discoveries. In an average year, only about $20 or $30 million is spent exploring for gold in the Yukon. Now that the price of gold is breaking record highs, about $100 million is spent in an average year. But in 2011, the Yukon Geological Survey estimates almost $330 million will be spent for work programs and drilling this summer in the Yukon. With so much exploration going on, someone will no doubt find gold. Almost 20 million ounces of placer gold have been taken out of the Yukon Territory over the century. The Yukon overall has the biggest placer gold signatures in the world— meaning there are very large sources of gold in the Yukon from whence this gold sprang. Geologists generally agree that the source of the placer deposits is typically 10 times larger than the amount of placer gold discovered in an area. In the case of …

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Weekend: The Fool Proof Retirement Plan

Welcome to the Wealth Daily Weekend Edition— our insights from the week in investing and links to our most-read Wealth Daily and sister publication articles. As I wrote earlier in the week, dividend reinvestment plans — or DRIPs — are a great way to secure your financial future. All you need is the time and patience to stick to the blueprint… The best part is these plans are offered by more than 1,100 companies and are available to investors of all stripes, making it possible to purchase shares of stock without using a broker. This allows investors to buy stock directly from the company in very small amounts— something that can be more difficult and costly when compared to buying shares through your broker. In fact most companies don’t charge a fee, and the minimum investment can be as low as $10. Advertisement 60 Minutes Reports on Growing Body Parts Call it what you want: biotechnology, tissue engineering, cell therapy, regenerative medicine. The famous newsmagazine has reported on one doctor about to make multiple medical problems disappear forever. Lucky for you, that same doctor sits on the board of a $3.00 company that will bring these solutions to market— making shareholders rich in the process. Check out the 60 Minutes clip to learn the name. The plans also reinvest all or partial dividends paid into more stock, thus the name “Dividend Reinvestment Plan.” And in this case — since the investment is based on dollar amounts — you can purchase fractional shares. In addition, investors can choose to add a monthly contribution to the plan, boosting the amount of wealth the DRIP can create. That means you can start out with as little…

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Global Cotton Demand Outstrips Supply

Filed in AIG, commodities, New Gold, o, South African Gold by on February 12, 2011 0 Comments
Global Cotton Demand Outstrips Supply

Filed under: India , Market Matters , Commodities Years ago, I remember a conversation among cotton traders: “Cotton is a straight line mover. When it moves it shoots straight up and when it falls its like a stone. … If you ever get caught on the wrong side of cotton, you’ll lose your shirt.” Someday, traders will tell their grandchildren about the great cotton bull market of 2009 to 2011, and how they bought 100 contracts at 60 cents a pound in 2009 and saw the price go to $1.9455 per pound. They will talk for hours about how they made $1.34 per pound on each contract (each 1 penny equals $500). So they made 134 pennies on each contract at $500 per penny times the 100 contracts. They will ask their grandchildren to figure out how much money they made. “Grandpa, you made $6,700,000!” Continue reading Global Cotton Demand Outstrips Supply Global Cotton Demand Outstrips Supply originally appeared on BloggingStocks on Sat, 12 Feb 2011 11:40:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Permalink | Email this | Comments

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Millionaires More Likely to Strategic Default

Filed in BP, CBS, Gold, GOld juniors, Gold Market, housing-market, Lear, o by on February 8, 2011 0 Comments
Millionaires More Likely to Strategic Default

Not surprisingly, the bursting of the housing bubble has moved up to the final rung on the ladder. Far from the days of the subprime debacle, now even the “good” people are getting squeezed. The difference is the rich are smart enough to walk away from it all. In fact, homeowners with loans of more than $1 million default at a much higher rate than “the little people” do. From CBS News entitled: Even More Millionaires Defaulting on Mortgage “ For Darren Thomas that ocean view was quickly losing its value. He says, “I bought it for [$1.385 million]. It is worth less than [$800,000], maybe less.” Thomas bought his townhome in 2006 but after seeing its value drop steadily he stopped paying. “I haven’t made a payment in two years,” he says. “It was business decision. It was an easy decision. I have a property worth six or 700,000 less than when I bought it. I was making payments of 10,000 a month.” Thomas has gone into strategic default. He could make payments but is refusing to put more money into a home that is worth less than his mortgage. Among luxury homeowners he is not alone. One in seven homeowners with loans over $1 million are seriously delinquent compared to one in 12 with mortgages below $1 million. The more you owe, it seems, the better off you may be. Darren Thomas continues to live in his home because banks are often slower to foreclose on million-dollar homes. For those who have stopped paying their million-dollar mortgages it’s just an investment that didn’t work out. “As negative equity took place and drove the value down it became an investment not worth holding onto,” says Corelogic’s Mark Flemming. “Not much different than a regular stock you would sell.” “People like myself, business people, are going it is silly to throw good money after bad,” says Thomas “The loss is not mine. The loss is the banks.” When it comes to real estate, the rich are different. They can be just as ruthless as the bankers.” I guess Nick Carraway was wrong after all. In some ways the rich really are just like the rest of us….suckers for a good bubble. The difference is they understand the money/business part of the game better than most. For them its just a business decision. By the way, according to CoreLogic, home price have fallen for the fifth straight month. Overall, house prices delined 1.8% for the month of December. Related Articles: Case-Shiller Index Shows Renewed Home Price Declines 2011 Housing Market Forecast Case-Shiller Index Screams Housing Double Dip Meredith Whitney Predicts a Housing Double-Dip Zandi: Expect 8% Home Price Declines To learn more about Wealth Daily click here Millionaires More Likely to Strategic Default originally appeared in Wealth Daily . Wealth Daily is a free daily newsletter featuring contrarian investment insights and commentary.

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Carlos Slim Catches Gold Fever

Carlos Slim Catches Gold Fever

Carlos Slim beat both Warren Buffett and Bill Gates in stock market performance last year. The reason: a hell-bent plan to start a brand-new gold and silver mining company in Mexico. Slim’s publicly disclosed holdings jumped 37% to $70 billion in 2010, according to data compiled by Bloomberg . Meanwhile, Buffett helped return a 22% gain for Berkshire Hathaway last year, and Gates’ Microsoft fell, hurting his overall annual returns even as he spread his investments into other sectors… The World’s Richest Man catches gold fever Slim — who made his fortune by building one of the world’s biggest telecommunication empires — has recently been making significant investments in gold and silver, particularly with a focus on precious metal mining in Mexico. Carlos Slim became the world’s richest man in 2010 with an estimated net worth of $55 billion. And a new spin-off mining company may help him widen his lead atop the global wealth list… Back in August, Slim’s holding company, Grupo Carso, S.A.B. de C.V., announced it would spin off a new precious metal mining company that would be focused on gold and silver mining in Mexico. The news added billions to Slim’s already ridiculous fortune as the plan to spin off the new company sent shares of Grupo Carso soaring in 2010, making it his best-performing asset last year. The new company (called Minera Frisco) produced nearly 200,000 ounces of gold and 5.5 million ounces of silver from its Mexican projects in 2010. Frisco recently reported plans to spend nearly $750 million this year to ramp up gold and silver production. The company estimates production from new mines in Mexico will more than double the company’s gold production to 440,000 ounces and nearly quadruple its silver production to 19.1 million ounces in 2011. Shares of Minera Frisco began trading Mexican Stock Exchange at the beginning of this year. But Slim and his family received nearly 80% of the new shares of Minera Frisco, and the stock is very thinly traded. Most analysts and investors will most likely avoid covering or owning this stock… However, there are many suitable alternative companies with a focus on gold and silver mining in Mexico. The largest of Minera Frisco’s publicly-traded competitors is the London-based silver major Fresnillo plc (LON: FRES) . Fresnillo plc Exchange: Symbol London: FRES P/E 39.76 Share Price 1,450 GBX Divided 5.90 GBX Market Cap 10.41 Billion GBP Yield 1.12% Fresnillo is the …

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Why Economists Are Not Popular

Filed in BP, deflation, Ford, o, silver, US Dollar by on February 7, 2011 0 Comments

One of the many reasons why economists are unpopular is that they keep reminding people that things have costs, that there is no free lunch. People already know that — but they like to forget it when there is something they have their hearts set on. Economists don’t have to say anything when people are buying things at a shopping mall or at an automobile dealership. The price tags convey the situation in unmistakable terms. It is when people are voting for nice-sounding things which politicians have dreamed up that economists are likely to point out that the costs ignored by politicians are going to have to be paid, one way or another — and that you have to weigh those costs against whatever benefits you expect. Who wants to put on green eye shades and start adding up the numbers when someone grandly proclaims, “access to health care for all” or “clean air” or “saving the environment”? Economists are strictly party-poopers at times like these. They are often gate crashers too, since usually nobody asked them how much these things would cost or even thought about these issues in such terms. Some of the more persistent or insensitive economists may even raise questions about the goals themselves. How much health care at the taxpayers’ expense? In Britain, a 12-year-old-girl was given breast implants. That much health care? Meanwhile, Britain’s skyrocketing medical costs of taking care of things that people would never have spent their own money to take care of forced cutbacks and delays in more urgently needed medical treatments. One woman’s cancer operation was postponed so many times by the British health service that, by the time the system could take her, the disease was now too far gone for medical help — and she died. Economists could have told anyone in advance that making things “free” causes excessive use by some, leaving less for others with more urgent needs that have to remain unsatisfied. Rent control, for example, has led to more housing being occupied by some, who would not have paid the …

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Ben Plans, Food Prices Reach All-Time Highs

Ben Plans, Food Prices Reach All-Time Highs

Don’t you just love the Federal Reserve…? Higher prices have helped to set the world ablaze and Bernanke & Co. continue to insist inflation is a figment of our imagination. You see, despite the obvious fact that commodity prices are skyrocketing……. …the Fed comes out with this nonsense this morning. About inflation the Bernank remarked: “On the inflation front, we have recently seen significant increases in some highly visible prices, notably for gasoline. Indeed, prices of many commodities have risen lately, largely as a result of the very strong demand from fast-growing emerging market economies, coupled, in some cases, with constraints on supply. Nevertheless, overall inflation remains quite low : Over the 12 months ending in December, prices for all the goods and services purchased by households increased by only 1.2 percent, down from 2.4 percent over the prior 12 months. To assess underlying trends in inflation, economists also follow several alternative measures of inflation; one such measure is so-called core inflation, which excludes the more volatile food and energy components and therefore can be a better predictor of where overall inflation is headed. Core inflation was only 0.7 percent in 2010, compared with around 2-1/2 percent in 2007, the year before the recession began.” Meanwhile, the reality is food prices around the world have hit their highest levels EVER… From Breitbart entitled: World food prices hit record high: UN agency “ World food prices reached their highest level ever recorded in January and are set to keep rising for months, the UN food agency said on Thursday, warning that the hardest-hit countries could face turmoil. Rising food prices have been cited among the driving forces behind recent popular revolts in north Africa, including the uprising in Egypt and the toppling …

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Answering Krugman on Austrian Economic Theory

Answering Krugman on Austrian Economic Theory

I still get the sense that Krugman truly doesn’t understand the Austrian position. For example, he asks, “Why is there overwhelming evidence that when central banks decide to slow the economy, the economy does indeed slow?” But because the Austrian theory says the bust occurs when the central bank backs off and allows interest rates to rise toward their “correct” level, this is hardly a problem. In fact, if central banks couldn’t slow the economy, as an Austrian economist I would be worried about my theory. Krugman also poses questions concerning (price) inflation rates and the connection between nominal and real GDP. But I think he is conflating the Austrian theory with a purely “real” business-cycle theory. Austrians understand that monetary influences can have real effects. To repeat, that is the very essence of the Mises-Hayek theory. Although most of Krugman’s objections are due to his unfamiliarity with the actual Austrian theory, I think one source of confusion came from the particular illustration I used in my article. First let’s set the context by quoting Krugman : “So what is the essence of this Austrian story? Basically, it says that what we call an economic boom is actually something like China’s disastrous Great Leap Forward, which led to a temporary surge in consumption but only at the expense of degradation of the country’s underlying productive capacity. And the unemployment that follows is a result of that degradation: there’s simply nothing useful for the unemployed workers to do. “I like this story, and there are probably other cases besides China 1958–1961 to which it applies. But what reason do we have to think that it has anything to do with the business cycles we actually see in market economies?” First, I should say I’m glad that Krugman at least concedes that (his understanding of) the Austrian explanation both is theoretically possible and actually happens in the real world — coming from the guy who referred to it in 1998 as equivalent to the “phlogiston theory of fire,” this is progress! However, Krugman still doesn’t have quite the right understanding of the Austrian view of the “capital consumption” that occurs during the unsustainable boom. As I said above, on this particular issue the fault lies with the necessarily simplistic “sushi model” I used in the article that Krugman read . In that article, in order to make sure the reader really saw why Krugman (and Tyler Cowen) were overlooking something basic, I had the villagers boost their daily sushi intake even while they developed a new technology to help augment their fishing. So during their “boom,” it would have seemed to a dull villager that both consumption and investment were rising. In my fable, this was physically possible because the villagers neglected the regular maintenance of their boats…

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Mythbusting Gold's Volatility | www.bullfax.com

Filed in Barrick Gold, Gold, Gold Miners, Indonesian Gold, miners, o, shares by on January 26, 2011 0 Comments

Canadian gold miners tumble after bullion sell-off. Shares of Barrick Gold and other gold-mining majors fell on Friday on the Toronto Stock Exchange following a nearly 4% drop in the price of gold bullion on Thursday. …

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Case-Shiller Index Shows Renewed Home Price Declines

Filed in BP, Gold, Gold Market, housing-market, Lear, o by on January 25, 2011 0 Comments
Case-Shiller Index Shows Renewed Home Price Declines

This one is no real surprise since the double dip in home prices is accelerating…. From Bloomberg by Shobhana Chandra entitled: Home Prices in Us. Declined 1.6% From Year Earlie “ Residential real-estate prices dropped in November by the most in a year, signaling housing has yet to join the U.S. rebound. The S&P/Case-Shiller index of home values in 20 cities fell 1.6 percent from November the prior year, the biggest 12-month decrease since December 2009, the group said today in New York. The decline matched the median forecast of economists surveyed by Bloomberg News. “ The housing market is in a state of hibernation,” said Zach Pandl , an economist at Nomura Securities International Inc. in New York. “We have a very severe foreclosure problem. Prices are going to keep weakening this year. Weakness in the housing market is likely to keep the Fed relatively cautious in its statement tomorrow.” The Case-Shiller gauge is based on a three-month average, which means the November data was influenced by transactions in October and September. Sixteen of the 20 cities in the index showed a year-over- year decline, led by a 7.9 percent drop in Atlanta. In November, prices in eight markets dropped to fresh lows from their 2006, 2007 peaks. “ With these numbers more analysts will be calling for a double-dip in home prices ,” David Blitzer , chairman of the index committee at S&P, said in a statement. A double-dip would be reached when the 20-city index sets a new post-peak low, which may happen in the first half of this year, said Blitzer. Industry projections reinforce the concern about housing. The number of homes receiving a foreclosure filing will climb about 20 percent in 2011, reaching a peak for the housing crisis, said RealtyTrac Inc., an Irvine, California-based data seller. Home values may drop as much as 11 percent through the first quarter of 2012, which would put them 36 percent below their 2006 peak, according to a Dec. 8 Morgan Stanley report.” From the looks of this report, it is shaping up to be another tough Spring. Related Articles: 2011 Housing Market Forecast Case-Shiller Index Screams Housing Double Dip Meredith Whitney Predicts a Housing Double-Dip Zandi: Expect 8% Home Price Declines To learn more about Wealth Daily click here Advertisement “R-4 Trigger” Predicts Which Options Will Jump 68% or More After three full years of beta testing (and cumulative returns of 10,805%), the “R-4 Trigger” is ready for public release… Which means, just 27 days from now, you could be sitting on easy 68% gains. Click here to learn more. Case-Shiller Index Shows Renewed Home Price Declines originally appeared in Wealth Daily . Wealth Daily is a free daily newsletter featuring contrarian investment insights and commentary.

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Weekend: A Digital Pearl Harbor

Welcome to the Wealth Daily Weekend Edition— our insights from the week in investing and links to our most-read Wealth Daily and sister publication articles. From Sun Tzu to “Stormin’ Norman” Schwarzkopf, the goal of every military commander has always been pretty simple: to kill people and break things. Beat the other guy, and your name will find its way into the history books… The only thing that changes is the technology. From the longbow to the ballistic missile, the arms race is one that never sleeps. One of the fastest growing fronts in this struggle is in cyberspace. Today’s style of combat is geek versus geek. But don’t believe for a second that it’s not just as dangerous… Because while it doesn’t involve tanks or fighter squadrons, cyberwar’s ability to disrupt an enemy is just as effective, and often equally destructive. It’s war by other means — one that focuses on using computer code to strike an enemy’s Achilles’ heel. Full-scale cyberwar The recent discovery of a computer worm called Stuxnet is a perfect example of the damage a hacker armed with code can create. Using the “most advanced and aggressive malware in history,” cyberwarriors have now set Iran’s nuclear ambitions back by two years, according to most estimates. (Not surprisingly, Israel and the United States are at the top of the suspect list.) The worm itself attacked controllers critical to operations at Natanz, a sprawling enrichment site in Iran’s desert. As operators stared blankly at their screens, the bug’s centrifuges spun wildly out of control, tearing systems apart. “This was nearly as effective as a military strike, but even better since there are no fatalities and no full-blown war. From a military perspective, this was a huge success,” said Ralph Langer, a top German Security expert. “It will take two years for Iran to get back on track.” This is only the latest cyber skirmish… Back in 2007, Estonia fell victim to what Wired Magazine dubbed “Web War One”. Hounded by three weeks of digital assaults, Estonia’s electronic Maginot Line proved as feeble as the original. The country’s firewalls withered as a flood of data sent by the nation’s unknown opponents quickly crashed one system after another, crippling numerous vital public services. Websites of government ministries, banks, and newspapers all fell victim. And while the rest of the world watched the attacks with a combination of curiosity and indifference, military planners…

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